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Ne1L C1,171 posts since 11 Sep 2011
Because there was a strike on and Channel were concentrating their efforts on primetime.


Wouldn't it have been easier to simply open at 5 and concentrate all their resources for primetime?

The afternoon news and schedule was designed to inform the viewer of that night's schedule. The schedules were put in place on an ad hoc basis, so a day to day schedule would be created in the morning, and provided in the afternoon, at lunchtime, when people were off work on lunch break etc.


Hmm Good point. Makes me realise how much of a backbone the national schedule was.
bluecortina875 posts since 26 Jul 2012
I’d like to add a little more pertinent background info to Tony Currie’s excellent post earlier.

The working arrangements between the ACTT and ITV were governed by what was called ‘The White Book’. I still have my copy and I have it in front of me. The two parties to the agreement are the ACTT on the one hand and every ITV company with the exception of Channel on the other hand. Channel TV was not covered by this agreement. Channel TV could simply not afford to pay the nationwide agreed pay rates and working conditions so they were always excluded from this ‘national agreement’ as it was commonly referred to.

In this way the ACTT could call out the entire ITV network on strike but leave Channel TV alone as a strike there would have meant financial ruin from which no-one could foresee a recovery. So common sense prevailed and Channel TV were left free to continue as best they could.

As Tony rightly points out, any attempt to expand Channel’s service outside their area would have caused headaches for both the ACTT and the remaining ITV companies. No-one wanted that.
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Markymark7,292 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
The reason I was sent up to the north of Jersey to pick up Radio Victory news and scribble it down was that Channel had an agreement with LBC to take the news. It was all above board, but there wasn't a way LBC could feed the scripts to Channel. No email, no Fax machine!!
.


This is interesting. How did IRN/LBC distribute scripts to the ILR stations in the 70s? Some of the larger ones opted to locally read and incorporate the national news into their own bulletins (particularly at breakfast and drive time) Indeed this was before the age of fax machines, but Telex machines were in common usage then? Channel were a small company, but too small to have Telex?
Markymark7,292 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
It must have been very hard for Channel, especially accessing archive material to air. Channel had no direct access to ITV archive programming and had to have them flown into St Helier on film for transmission right?


I might be wrong, but I don't think any of what they showed on film was from the ITV companies, it was all films and US imports.


That's my understanding too, I recall a news paper article at the time, and I think Channel was getting stuff flown in, some of directly (well via LHR !) from the US ?
TonyCurrie398 posts since 19 Sep 2003
STV Central Reporting Scotland
The reason I was sent up to the north of Jersey to pick up Radio Victory news and scribble it down was that Channel had an agreement with LBC to take the news. It was all above board, but there wasn't a way LBC could feed the scripts to Channel. No email, no Fax machine!!
.


This is interesting. How did IRN/LBC distribute scripts to the ILR stations in the 70s? Some of the larger ones opted to locally read and incorporate the national news into their own bulletins (particularly at breakfast and drive time) Indeed this was before the age of fax machines, but Telex machines were in common usage then? Channel were a small company, but too small to have Telex?


Good point. It's possible that the NUJ weren't happy about changing their work pattern to feed a telex to Channel - I just recall that the IRN scripts were kosher but they were not providing hard copy.
The views expressed on this forum are entirely my own.
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Markymark gave kudos
TonyCurrie398 posts since 19 Sep 2003
STV Central Reporting Scotland
It must have been very hard for Channel, especially accessing archive material to air. Channel had no direct access to ITV archive programming and had to have them flown into St Helier on film for transmission right?


I might be wrong, but I don't think any of what they showed on film was from the ITV companies, it was all films and US imports.


That's my understanding too, I recall a news paper article at the time, and I think Channel was getting stuff flown in, some of directly (well via LHR !) from the US ?


There were no programmes from other ITV companies (The New Avengers was made independently) but I think the films were provided by Leslie Halliwell's department. There vwas a fresh Feature Film every night.
The views expressed on this forum are entirely my own.
Markymark7,292 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
The reason I was sent up to the north of Jersey to pick up Radio Victory news and scribble it down was that Channel had an agreement with LBC to take the news. It was all above board, but there wasn't a way LBC could feed the scripts to Channel. No email, no Fax machine!!
.


This is interesting. How did IRN/LBC distribute scripts to the ILR stations in the 70s? Some of the larger ones opted to locally read and incorporate the national news into their own bulletins (particularly at breakfast and drive time) Indeed this was before the age of fax machines, but Telex machines were in common usage then? Channel were a small company, but too small to have Telex?


Good point. It's possible that the NUJ weren't happy about changing their work pattern to feed a telex to Channel - I just recall that the IRN scripts were kosher but they were not providing hard copy.


Did you become proficient at shorthand during your stay there ? Cool
james-20015,393 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
It must have been very hard for Channel, especially accessing archive material to air. Channel had no direct access to ITV archive programming and had to have them flown into St Helier on film for transmission right?


I might be wrong, but I don't think any of what they showed on film was from the ITV companies, it was all films and US imports.


That's my understanding too, I recall a news paper article at the time, and I think Channel was getting stuff flown in, some of directly (well via LHR !) from the US ?


Did the ITV companies produce much on film anyway? Maybe some of the big budgeted shows designed to sell internationally (ITC/Euston Films for example), but I think most stuff was on video which Channel would have been unable to show even if they had access to it, I think even transferring stuff to telerecordings was all but dead by the end of the 70s.
noggin14,628 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I think even transferring stuff to telerecordings was all but dead by the end of the 70s.


Telerecording was still in use at the BBC well into the 80s, to allow content shot on video to be included in inserts or programmes which were otherwise entirely shot and edited on film, and which didn't go through a VT edit. (As an example, I clearly remember a TV drama shot and edited on film, with film credits, based in a TV station, where the video output of the studio was included as a telerecording)
Markymark7,292 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

I might be wrong, but I don't think any of what they showed on film was from the ITV companies, it was all films and US imports.


That's my understanding too, I recall a news paper article at the time, and I think Channel was getting stuff flown in, some of directly (well via LHR !) from the US ?


Did the ITV companies produce much on film anyway? Maybe some of the big budgeted shows designed to sell internationally (ITC/Euston Films for example), but I think most stuff was on video which Channel would have been unable to show even if they had access to it, I think even transferring stuff to telerecordings was all but dead by the end of the 70s.


From memory there was some, Southern: Worzel Gummage, LWT: Catweasel, Granada: The Owl Service, Anglia: Survival, YTV: Whicker's World,