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bilky asko5,176 posts since 9 Sep 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Do they not teach BBC ONE continuity announcers correct pronunciation these days? Both network and Scotland mispronounced 'grande dame'.


Mmmm...could be a lot worse.

Tonight's lottery numbers are: free, firteen, twenty-free, firty, firty-free and forty-free. The bonus ball is: fifty-free. There were free winners of tonight's draw - each receiving free-hundred-and-firty-free fousand pounds.


Yes. How dare a regional accent make it to the BBC.
5
Colorband, ittrgrey and 3 others
  • Brekkie
  • Jake
  • BBI45
gave kudos
MMcG198587 posts since 14 Dec 2014
UTV Newsline
Do they not teach BBC ONE continuity announcers correct pronunciation these days? Both network and Scotland mispronounced 'grande dame'.


Mmmm...could be a lot worse.

Tonight's lottery numbers are: free, firteen, twenty-free, firty, firty-free and forty-free. The bonus ball is: fifty-free. There were free winners of tonight's draw - each receiving free-hundred-and-firty-free fousand pounds.


Yes. How dare a regional accent make it to the BBC.


I'm not having that discussion again. The pronunciation of those words/numbers is wrong. Not debatable.
6
Stuart, Alex Plain-Later and 4 others
  • John
  • PFMC84
  • Si-Co
  • chris
gave kudos
bilky asko5,176 posts since 9 Sep 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)

Mmmm...could be a lot worse.

Tonight's lottery numbers are: free, firteen, twenty-free, firty, firty-free and forty-free. The bonus ball is: fifty-free. There were free winners of tonight's draw - each receiving free-hundred-and-firty-free fousand pounds.


Yes. How dare a regional accent make it to the BBC.


I'm not having that discussion again. The pronunciation of those words/numbers is wrong. Not debatable.


Th-fronting is a part of many regional accents. It isn't, therefore, "wrong". You just happen to dislike it.
1
Colorband gave kudos
MMcG198587 posts since 14 Dec 2014
UTV Newsline

Yes. How dare a regional accent make it to the BBC.


I'm not having that discussion again. The pronunciation of those words/numbers is wrong. Not debatable.


Th-fronting is a part of many regional accents. It isn't, therefore, "wrong". You just happen to dislike it.


Just because the use of th-fronting is becoming more common does not make it right. There is a widely recognised, longstanding correct pronunciation of these words. I have absolutely no objection to the use of regional accents - in fact, I welcome it. However, when an accent stretches things to a point where there's a significant deviation from the standard pronunciation of words, that's where I believe we have a problem. And 'th' becoming 'f' is one such example. I am aware of many accents which have many such deviations - and I can assure you, we'll never hear one of those accents announcing programmes on BBC One because the majority of the population would not understand half of what's being said.

There's a significant role for schools in all of this. I have read many reports of teachers being criticised for their regional accents. I am all for celebrating the rich diversity of accents. However, there are certain fundamental elements of pronunciation that need to be protected and standardised in our English lessons.
2
John and Alex Plain-Later gave kudos
Brekkie29,986 posts since 4 Jan 2003 Recently warned
HTV Wales Wales Today

I'm not having that discussion again. The pronunciation of those words/numbers is wrong. Not debatable.


Th-fronting is a part of many regional accents. It isn't, therefore, "wrong". You just happen to dislike it.


Just because the use of th-fronting is becoming more common does not make it right. There is a widely recognised, longstanding correct pronunciation of these words. I have absolutely no objection to the use of regional accents - in fact, I welcome it. However, when an accent stretches things to a point where there's a significant deviation from the standard pronunciation of words, that's where I believe we have a problem. And 'th' becoming 'f' is one such example. I am aware of many accents which have many such deviations - and I can assure you, we'll never hear one of those accents announcing programmes on BBC One because the majority of the population would not understand half of what's being said.

There's a significant role for schools in all of this. I have read many reports of teachers being criticised for their regional accents. I am all for celebrating the rich diversity of accents. However, there are certain fundamental elements of pronunciation that need to be protected and standardised in our English lessons.

It is attitudes like that which lead to one of my biggest pet hates in TV - people speaking in English being subtitled due to their accent. Thankfully it happens less here than in the States but at best it is insulting and ignorant, at worst it is outright racism.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
3
davidhorman, _Tom_ and Warbler gave kudos
davidhorman2,058 posts since 8 Mar 2005
Channel Channel Islands
English dictionaries are descriptive, not proscriptive. "Most common" - or "closest to the home counties" - doesn't make any pronunciation right . I presume it doesn't annoy you when Kirsty Wark presents Newsnight, even though her pronunication should be, by those standards, atrocious.
Square Eyes7,584 posts since 31 Mar 2001
I notice BBC One appear to be randomly burning off an episode of 'Wedding Day Winners' at 17:15. I take it it didn't finish its run earlier in the year after tanking in the ratings?

Have all of the Partners in Rhyme episodes now aired?