Mass Media & Technology

Interesting and unusual uses of teletext

(November 2017)

SP
Steve in Pudsey Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
This is the Ceefax parody from the Look Around You DVD
Write that down in your copybook now.
GE
thegeek Founding member London London
dvboy posted:
I remember arriving at a hotel once and the TV had a teletext-based welcome message on the TV for me, so there's another use for it.

Oh, you've just reminded me of the TVs in the Wood Norton hotel, which had some radio channels featuring Teletext-style screens showing the RDS data for the station. I think they were Rolec-branded. Not strictly Teletext (it was the modulated output on a ringmain) but it certainly use the same sort of character generator.
IS
Inspector Sands

BBC Scotland's 'Naked Video' used to do this type of thing. Can't recall if these are definitely taken from that programme.

Similar era, but different programme.


Another programme that used mode 7 graphics was Three of a Kind which had a title sequence created with them
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
dvboy posted:
I remember arriving at a hotel once and the TV had a teletext-based welcome message on the TV for me, so there's another use for it.

Oh, you've just reminded me of the TVs in the Wood Norton hotel, which had some radio channels featuring Teletext-style screens showing the RDS data for the station. I think they were Rolec-branded. Not strictly Teletext (it was the modulated output on a ringmain) but it certainly use the same sort of character generator.


Now, that's my kind of hotel !!!!
SP
Steve in Pudsey Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Another random use of Teletext - Philip Schofield doing the chart run down in the broom cupboard by cutting to the Pages from Ceefax generator, with the Top 40 page selected and on hold.
Write that down in your copybook now.
GE
thegeek Founding member London London
dvboy posted:
I remember arriving at a hotel once and the TV had a teletext-based welcome message on the TV for me, so there's another use for it.

Oh, you've just reminded me of the TVs in the Wood Norton hotel, which had some radio channels featuring Teletext-style screens showing the RDS data for the station. I think they were Rolec-branded. Not strictly Teletext (it was the modulated output on a ringmain) but it certainly use the same sort of character generator.


Now, that's my kind of hotel !!!!

Each of the rooms had some framed publicity photos from BBC shows - the most appropriate one for a long stretch was the Alan Partridge room. Oh yes, and there was an amp feeding a line out from the telly to a speaker in the bathroom. I suspect these features were all installed when the hotel was under BBC Resources ownership.
IS
Inspector Sands
Did the Alan Partridge room had a drawer you're not supposed to open?
HC
Hatton Cross Central (West) Midlands Today
And a certain type of channel on the TV that you had to ring reception and ask if they could put it on.. Wink!
Readers are warned that this post contains some flash photography

158 days later

RI
Riaz
The US never adopted teletext on any significant scale but they had the V chip activated using data on line 21 of the VBI.

There have been instances of where teletext has been used for bulk data transfer between computers by enabling data to be inserted into a communications channel designed for video. In some cases it has used video links inaccessible to the public (often with no video, just sync pulses) and other times on a broadcast TV network which would result in random data appearing on a TV screen in teletext mode.
NG
noggin Founding member
Riaz posted:
The US never adopted teletext on any significant scale but they had the V chip activated using data on line 21 of the VBI.


No - though a number of US stations ran services in the early 80s. Most used the 525/60 version of WST (i.e. the same system used in the UK modified for NTSC) - and I think TBS in particular ran a service. Zenith made TVs that had decoders, but when they re-engineered to add stereo functionality to their range, the teletext functionality was dropped, as by then it was clear it was going nowhere.

Some other stations in North America used a different system - NABTS (North American Broadcast Text Service) - which I think was originated in Canada and may have been linked to the French Antiope service a bit (France had their own bespoke teletext standard for a number of years before switching to WST).

Subtitles (aka Closed Captions) in North America are delivered using a separate system (much cruder, but also more robust, so it survived VHS recording) and the V-Chip system was integrated into this standard AIUI.

Quote:

There have been instances of where teletext has been used for bulk data transfer between computers by enabling data to be inserted into a communications channel designed for video. In some cases it has used video links inaccessible to the public (often with no video, just sync pulses) and other times on a broadcast TV network which would result in random data appearing on a TV screen in teletext mode.


Yes - you could use as many lines as you liked with some WST decoders, allowing a much faster page access and bigger carousels. ISTR Reuters had a ring-main system that included full-screen teletext that allowed for very fast access to a lot of dealing room/markets data.

Other data-over-video standards have been used over the years. The Sony F1 system carried digital stereo audio over a vision circuit, and allowed digital audio to be recorded to VHS or Betamax. There was a similar system used for UMatic 3/4" industrial tape that was a key part of CD mastering for many years.

There were also systems that let you use VHS tapes for PC file backup in the days before CD-R/DVD-R recorders.

There were also other data formats used alongside CEEFAX in the UK. The BBC sold off some of its VBI space to allow for Datacast, which was used to broadcast price lists to shops like Dixons (in the days before broadband connectivity), and ISTR that PresFax (in a number of incarnations) sent data in blanking (though I think the final iteration of PresFax actually sent packets in the general CEEFAX stream that only PresFax decoders bothered with) (PresFax carried junction data to the English regions, with the original version also carrying junction scripts AIUI)
RK
Rkolsen World News

Subtitles (aka Closed Captions) in North America are delivered using a separate system (much cruder, but also more robust, so it survived VHS recording) and the V-Chip system was integrated into this standard AIUI.


The US used EIA-608 aka Line 21 standard for captions. There were some oddities like CC1 being used for English with the odd frame rate field and for the SAP (secondary audio program) or usually Spanish used the even field but was labeled CC3. Line 21 was also used for minor EPG where the current and next program would be used in VCRs but rarely implemented.

The CEA-708 digital standard isn’t as flexible when it comes to recording. If your using a DVR it’s fine but if your outputting your receiver to a VCR (even ones with digital tuners) or a DVD recorder your out of luck. You would have to have your receiver output the captions to the recording device and they’d be burnt in with no way to turn them off.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
NG
noggin Founding member

The CEA-708 digital standard isn’t as flexible when it comes to recording. If your using a DVR it’s fine but if your outputting your receiver to a VCR (even ones with digital tuners) or a DVD recorder your out of luck. You would have to have your receiver output the captions to the recording device and they’d be burnt in with no way to turn them off.


Ah - I thought there were STBs that did 708 to 608 conversion at one point to allow for TV rather than STB decoding ? These would only work on SD outputs (same issue with DVB teletext, which can be re-inserted into an SD VBI for analogue SD output and display decoding, but has to be receiver decoded and burned into video for HD HDMI outputs)

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