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Joe6,360 posts since 9 Oct 2005
Meridian (South) South Today
Equally, why make them look ugly?

To somebody graphically-minded, i.e. the sort of person who would be creating this anyway, creating something 'pretty' (and let's be honest, the above is hardly a huge deviation from the norm) is not going to be any more difficult, really, than creating something simple. Especially when branding guidelines and books exist and will be worked from every day anyway.
VMPhil8,881 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Equally, why make them look ugly?

To somebody graphically-minded, i.e. the sort of person who would be creating this anyway, creating something 'pretty' (and let's be honest, the above is hardly a huge deviation from the norm) is not going to be any more difficult, really, than creating something simple. Especially when branding guidelines and books exist and will be worked from every day anyway.

Though I honestly think that VT clock looks more ugly than a generic VT clock
deejay2,769 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
Ever since vt clocks have been electronically generated (and that's now for a pretty long time) they've had more design effort gone into them. That, to be fair, isn't usually much more than a logo and a website, but for as long as television facility houses have been around, they've had branded vt clocks. It's important as part of their marketing within the broadcasting industry to make sure they're the first facility production people think of. No ones going to book a facility just because they've got a nice clock obviously but it's marketing all the same.
Two minutes regions...
deejay2,769 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
Yes, they really only serve purposes of programme/clip identification these days - and a very useful tool that is too. In playout terms, either as clips into a programme or programmes into a channel, they're useful in confirming when an item is supposed to begin (i.e. 5" after the clock says 5"). It's up to a local agreement as to whether items start on a clock or start on first frame of vision. For live programmes into BBC One/Two/Four clocks were dispensed with some years ago and live programmes are now asked to start on first frame of vision. At BBC News everything starts instantly. Clocks aren't put onto any video items apart from on Back Half Hour programmes. Even these aren't usually seen as the server cues up on first frame. If you do get a clock cueing up (usually as a result of bad in/out-point logging) it's brown-trouser time for the director.
Two minutes regions...
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UKnews and Steve in Pudsey gave kudos
peterrocket1,334 posts since 5 Sep 2001
Even playing off server you still might get clips incorrect, as the director might not see the playlist or, when they have several playout streams on a monitor wall, they need to know which one is the right one - which a VT clock would have helped ID.

What some broadcasters do, and I think GMB, is that the very first frame of the sequence contains metadata, and frame 2 is the actual content. The vision mixer would be able to trigger the server when the source is selected, but a delay is added to the visual switch - so by the time the switcher cuts up the server, it would have already started running and you'd never see the metadata on air.
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UBox gave kudos
noggin13,794 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I thought VT clocks for inserts were a relic of the days of tape having to get up to speed. If everything is a file on a playout system I can't see any need for the clock other than to aid identification of the material.


Nope - unless you are fully automated and using clip codes, clocks or slates (less ideal if working quickly) are still a vital tool for identifiying inserts (even if delivered as files) - particularly if you are updating inserts. The advantage of a clock is that it makes it a LOT quicker to correctly mark ins and outs than a slate. You don't run from the clock usually (you run from first frame) - but it is there as pre-vision before the in-point set on the server to confirm to the server op that they know which clip is which.
noggin13,794 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Even playing off server you still might get clips incorrect, as the director might not see the playlist or, when they have several playout streams on a monitor wall, they need to know which one is the right one - which a VT clock would have helped ID.

Also - playing out from server doesn't mean you are running a playlist. The server op may just be manually cueing by clip ID. If you aren't running with automation it would be unusual for a director to see a playlist - though many galleries will have the server output WITH status (i.e. timecode, duration left, clip name, notes etc.) superimposed in their stack so the director and PA/Script Sup can see more information.
Rkolsen2,288 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
Even playing off server you still might get clips incorrect, as the director might not see the playlist or, when they have several playout streams on a monitor wall, they need to know which one is the right one - which a VT clock would have helped ID.

What some broadcasters do, and I think GMB, is that the very first frame of the sequence contains metadata, and frame 2 is the actual content. The vision mixer would be able to trigger the server when the source is selected, but a delay is added to the visual switch - so by the time the switcher cuts up the server, it would have already started running and you'd never see the metadata on air.

From what I've seen in the US networks that's the case of a slate. It just confirms which package being played, how long it lasts and the outcue.

I imagine it's very helpful on the nightly and morning newscasts where there are multiple playout servers and many packages to be played. Rarely they get to air.
Last edited by Rkolsen on 30 June 2017 6:58am
Don’t let anyone treat you like your a VO/SOT when your a PKG.
thegeek4,556 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London
the Digital Production Partnership guidelines for completed programmes being delivered by file to all the major UK broadcasters says that a clock or slate can be used:
Quote:
Where a moving clock is used, it must provide a clear countdown of at least 7 seconds, including a hand moving in 1 sec steps (i.e. not smooth motion) around a circular clock face. Clocks with only digital countdown are not acceptable.


Obviously this doesn't apply to VT inserts, but I'd imagine post production houses would just apply the same rule to everything they churn out.