TV Home Forum

The earliest on-screen URL

(June 2017)

This site closed in March 2021 and is now a read-only archive
VM
VMPhil

Of course the concept of a proper extensive programme website has partially died off as well, instead linking to a glorified iplayer page or a facebook page.

Oh indeed, the BBC /programmes sites have more data and are unified but the genericness of them is a far cry from the elaborate show pages in the mid-2000s (when of course the BBC had more money to do such things). I remember the first series of Doctor Who having a specially created Flash site for each week's episode.
JA
james-2001
There may have been other shows that did datablasts too, looking at the comments of Tom Scott's video.


I'm sure How 2 did it.
IS
Inspector Sands
I'm sure that some early programmes about computers had a presence on BBS services or Prestel.

Talking if databursts, here's a Thames programme from 1984 about sending email. It includes a literal databurst at the end


If you're wondering what that little program is, someone on Reddit decoded it:
http://reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/4a8swx/how_to_send_an_e_mail_database_1984/d0ztzp2
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 10 June 2017 11:28pm
GM
GMc
I'd argue Twitter handles have even started to replace URLs.
On a related note, I remember several years back there was a bus stop advert that ran, which simply featured a search box with a search term in it (that I can't remember now). Upon searching said term, the first result was for some internet marketing company. I remember shortly afterwards, it seemed every advertiser was suddenly saying 'search for [insert company name or product]' or instead of directing people to a specific URL. That fad appears to have died off now.


ITV News London do that...seems a bit daft nowadays.
WH
Whataday Founding member
I'd argue Twitter handles have even started to replace URLs.

That would be awful, replacing a long-standing open medium with a closed medium from a company that doesn't even know how to run itself.


I think hashtags are more prominent than Twitter handles though. This was a bit ropey for a while because they were pretty much exclusive to Twitter so you had BBC shows effectively promoting one platform over others. Since then however, hashtags are widely used on most social networks.

Was the http:// actually needed in the early days? And index.html for that matter?
HA
Hazimworks
I'd argue Twitter handles have even started to replace URLs.

That would be awful, replacing a long-standing open medium with a closed medium from a company that doesn't even know how to run itself.


On a related note, I remember several years back there was a bus stop advert that ran, which simply featured a search box with a search term in it (that I can't remember now). Upon searching said term, the first result was for some internet marketing company. I remember shortly afterwards, it seemed every advertiser was suddenly saying 'search for [insert company name or product]' or instead of directing people to a specific URL. That fad appears to have died off now.

It still goes on in Japan and South Korea (for example Naver). But I saw some TV programmes prefer to use the word and shortform HP ("homepage") for website (as in "for more please visit our website") instead of revealing the full website address and asking viewers to search their website.

They also use the somewhat outdated "http://" thing. And they refer social media as "SNS" (social network system/service).

Nowadays we would prefer to write the website address without the http thing.
Last edited by Hazimworks on 11 June 2017 5:47am - 3 times in total
HA
Hazimworks
Of course on radio there's this from Pete Tong back in 1995:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyRklSLMqTM

There's a bit of history of BBCNC (BBC Networking Club) here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Online#BBC_Networking_Club
HA
Hazimworks
The earliest web plug of any kind I saw was on ITV's Bad Influence in 1994 (End credits 19:35 if the time doesn't work)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZ85MDPUSEc

Just an email address there, but later in the series the Yorkshire TV website was plugged too (19:26)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xlva8bL56MQ

Though there are countless episodes of BBC Micro Live that go all the way back to the 1980s where they plugged the various email like services of the time, like British Telecom Gold.


There's a short entry on British Telecom Gold here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecom_Gold
HA
Hazimworks
The datablast was an experiment in sending viewers an obscene amount of information in about thirty seconds or so, as Bad Influence did for a series or maybe two, though how effective this was is up for debate and also depended on whether one had the patience or even a semi-decent recording/machine that allowed one to pause and read stills like this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBs_ABt-hRc

There may have been other shows that did datablasts too, looking at the comments of Tom Scott's video.

Just imagine how many frames per second they did for each datablast frame. I'm sure if anyone has a video editing software you might know how many frames they did for each datablast frame. I'm guessing 5-10 frames per second.
RK
Rkolsen
Of course there's this gem from The Today Show back in 1994 arguing on how to say an email. It went viral enough that BMW did a commercial with Katie Couric and Bryant Gumbel talking about what is i3?

itsrobert, Quatorzine Neko and dbl gave kudos
IS
Inspector Sands

On a related note, I remember several years back there was a bus stop advert that ran, which simply featured a search box with a search term in it (that I can't remember now). Upon searching said term, the first result was for some internet marketing company. I remember shortly afterwards, it seemed every advertiser was suddenly saying 'search for [insert company name or product]' or instead of directing people to a specific URL. That fad appears to have died off now.

Lots of American TV programmes did something similar by promoting their AOL Keyword at the end rather than a URL. Mind you, yesterday I saw a sign for a local firm which told you what to Google rather than their url.
NJ
Neil Jones Founding member
I'd argue Twitter handles have even started to replace URLs.

That would be awful, replacing a long-standing open medium with a closed medium from a company that doesn't even know how to run itself.


I think hashtags are more prominent than Twitter handles though. This was a bit ropey for a while because they were pretty much exclusive to Twitter so you had BBC shows effectively promoting one platform over others. Since then however, hashtags are widely used on most social networks.

Was the http:// actually needed in the early days? And index.html for that matter?


Http officially yes but in practice didn't really matter.
index.html no as index.html would always be the start page.

https://eager.io/blog/the-history-of-the-url-path-fragment-query-auth/ posted:

the URL was fundamentally just an abbreviated way of refering [sic] to the combination of [stuff] which previously had to be understood contextually for each different communication system.

This system made it possible to refer to different systems from within Hypertext, but now that virtually all content is hosted over HTTP, may not be as necessary anymore. As early as 1996 browsers were already inserting the http:// and www. for users automatically


It was just good practice in the 90s to do it that way.

Newer posts