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cityprod1,459 posts since 3 Oct 2005
Westcountry Spotlight

I haven't really seen much of C4 Daily but it's very The Day Today isn't it.


Not really. Remember this pre-dates The Day Today by about 4 years or so.

Yes, so it's quite likely that it influenced The Day Today


Unlikely. I think The Day Today was more influenced by the bulletins of that time, such as the Trevor McDonald News At Ten, and the BBC's Nine O'Clock News, and also the output of stations like CNN. I don't think it's accurate to say The Channel 4 Daily had any direct or even indirect influence.
Brekkie27,783 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
Basically, some old cartoons, things like The New Fantastic Four, The Adventures of Batman, and other similar cartoons.

Did TV-am used to show a cartoon in the early part of the show. I know The Big Breakfast did for it's first few years and I think GMTV did originally as well as part of the main show, not just in the dedicated holiday slots.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
Neil Miles (previously oilywater) 86 posts since 23 Dec 2009
Meridian (South) South East Today
Basically, some old cartoons, things like The New Fantastic Four, The Adventures of Batman, and other similar cartoons.

Did TV-am used to show a cartoon in the early part of the show. I know The Big Breakfast did for it's first few years and I think GMTV did originally as well as part of the main show, not just in the dedicated holiday slots.


Pixie & Dixie rings a bell
Bob Paisley418 posts since 9 Aug 2005
London London

Not really. Remember this pre-dates The Day Today by about 4 years or so.

The World News and the News Headlines titles are similar, but the content never was, not even remotely close.

And Channel 4 Daily was much more than just the news segments. You had Countdown Masters, Comic Book, Box Office and Streetwise in the early going. By the end, out of those segments, only Box Office was still around as a Channel 4 Daily segment, though Comic Book was also a Saturday morning segment, introduced at the same time as The Channel 4 Daily, and stayed around longer on Saturdays than it did on weekdays.


What was Comic Book?


Basically, some old cartoons, things like The New Fantastic Four, The Adventures of Batman, and other similar cartoons.


Blimey, I have absolutely no memory of that at all. I remember when Channel 4 Daily began, but I don't remember ever seeing any cartoons. I would've loved watching that as a kid.
Steve Williams2,102 posts since 1 Aug 2008
In 1989, C4 Daily would have been coming from Wells Street, but I'm sure I've read somewhere it had a refresh when it moved into GIR. I suppose it's feasible that the old desk might have been used for the new Studio 3 at GIR?


I actually think that at the end the Channel Four Daily was coming from a studio in the Trocadero. I know from the fantastic TV Studio History that the main lunchtime edition of Business Daily came from there and towards the end, when the whole thing was done live in one studio, the business presenter did as much anchoring as the newsreader. I remember Dermot Murnaghan moving over from business to news.

Did TV-am used to show a cartoon in the early part of the show. I know The Big Breakfast did for it's first few years and I think GMTV did originally as well as part of the main show, not just in the dedicated holiday slots.


Yes they did, Pixie and Dixie were mentioned, and they showed lots of other Hanna Barbera cartoons as well, at about 7.20. I've also got a load of back issues of Look In from the mid-eighties where they highlight Popeye in their TV guide. When GMTV started, they had a proper kids spot called Alarm Alert with Simon Parkin every morning but because all the kids had gone to The Big Breakfast and the ratings were rubbish, they stopped bothering with that after a few weeks and replaced it with cartoons instead.

Blimey, I have absolutely no memory of that at all. I remember when Channel 4 Daily began, but I don't remember ever seeing any cartoons. I would've loved watching that as a kid.


This was sort of the problem with the Channel Four Daily, really, in that it really did feature everything so you had cartoons sitting next to intense financial news. C4 said that they weren't expecting to watch the whole thing but just spend ten minutes watching what they were interested in, which is all very well, but that does depend on the bit you want to watch being at the time you're actually able to watch it. With the other breakfast shows, you knew whenever you switched on that within ten minutes or so you'd get the news, weather and a bit of amiable chat. Here when you switched on it was pot luck what you got.

For a bit, there was a proper kids spot called Early Bird, it wasn't there at the start - the cartoons were branded as Comic Book, as mentioned - but came in with the first revamp in 1990, and had reviews and features alongside the cartoons, and there was an omnibus on Sundays. It then disappeared during the Gulf War but then when it came back it had a puppet presenter in the shape of Earl E Bird, which was quite anarchic and I used to really like it. That was how they solicited the contestants for the kids' Crystal Maze, I remember Richard O'Brien appearing to promote it. But then at the end of 1991 that stopped, seemingly they ran out of money, and then in 1992 they just showed the cartoons without any linking at all, which was a bit of a shame.

By the end of it there were actually three cartoons on the Channel Four Daily, which was a bit ridiculous and clearly only there to fill time. At 6am there was a full-length cartoon like Pole Position, but I remember that while it was billed in the TV guides as being part of the Daily, it was actually introduced with a C4 ident. Actually the first half hour was a bit odd, because I remember you had that, followed by an ad break and then at 6.25, Business Daily with its own title sequence, but from the Daily studio, and then at 6.30 you would have the opening titles and the show would start "properly". The "main" cartoon was at 7.35, and then there was another cartoon just before the end at 9.15.

Must have been a shock if the viewer missed the news about the Channel 4 Daily ending and tuned in the following Monday, to be met by a ginger bloke bouncing around the screen. Channel 4 went from one extreme to the other.


Well, this is going to make me sound a stupid kid, but in 1991 when the school summer holidays began I decided that because I had more time on my hands I would start watching breakfast TV every day (which before then, I hadn't) and plumped for the C4 Daily because, as mentioned, for the telly-mad kid it was really quite exciting, although by that point they'd dropped all the different studios and title sequences and so on. I liked Early Bird and also Box Office, because it often talked about the telly, although I did actually usually switch over to Breakfast News after eight o'clock because it got quite repetitive.

When I went back to school I stuck with it, preferably watching Box Office at 6.45 but if I overslept I would have to watch it at 7.45 and then rush to get ready for school. I stuck with it right to the better end and remember writing how sad I was about it finishing in my diary. Then on the Monday I watched The Big Breakfast, realised it was a million times better and forgot about The Channel Four Daily completely.
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Brekkie27,783 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
This was sort of the problem with the Channel Four Daily, really, in that it really did feature everything so you had cartoons sitting next to intense financial news. C4 said that they weren't expecting to watch the whole thing but just spend ten minutes watching what they were interested in, which is all very well, but that does depend on the bit you want to watch being at the time you're actually able to watch it. With the other breakfast shows, you knew whenever you switched on that within ten minutes or so you'd get the news, weather and a bit of amiable chat. Here when you switched on it was pot luck what you got.

Although that could be seen as an asset too at a time when breakfast shows on the whole had to appeal to the whole family, so putting something on which kept the kids quiet for 5 minutes could bring in viewers, even if the contrast from segment to segment may seem quite significant. It's also worth remembering (and I think many forget) that breakfast TV is part of a morning routine so it's useful to have different segments that people can dip in and out of in fairly bitesized chunks. I know my morning routine used to be based around the schedule of The Big Breakfast.

Then on the Monday I watched The Big Breakfast, realised it was a million times better and forgot about The Channel Four Daily completely.

How I miss the days when viewers were allowed to make their own mind up with new shows, and shows allowed time to evolve in their early days to try and get the formula right.

Vaguely bringing this back on topic did ITN bid for the breakfast franchise that GMTV won, or were they not allowed too? Did C4 have to get permission to extend their hours to cover Breakfast - I suspect TV-am had a lot to say about them launching a show backed by ITN.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
rob6,980 posts since 7 Apr 2001
Meridian (South) South Today

Vaguely bringing this back on topic did ITN bid for the breakfast franchise that GMTV won, or were they not allowed to?


ITN did bid for the breakfast franchise. There's a video on YouTube somewhere of a news report featuring their reaction to the news. I'd look for it now, but I've had a few to drink this evening. Wink
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