Catchup: all posts in the last 24 hours

128 posts, most recent first

123456
deejay2,877 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
I think some people fail to comprehend the difficulty in getting consistent graphics across so many different pieces of equipment. I work on motion and static graphics regularly and trying to create convincing solutions for different software is hard enough, let alone different pieces of hardware of different ages in different parts of the country. (I would imagine) you cannot simply ‘load on’ graphics from somewhere else. I think that this becomes clear as soon as you do anything remotely similar.


Absolutely. Add in to that the issue of it all being designed and delivered in HD to regional centres who are (largely) still SD. The difficulty in precisely aligning things like the breakfast clock (let alone getting the font right) is not to be underestimated. Last time breakfast changed their clock I seem to remember it was arranged for an all-centres video feed one morning from Salford with just the keyed clock on the output so that each region could tinker until they were all satisfied.
Two minutes regions...
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Spencer For Hire and harshy gave kudos
Moz5,419 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Wales Today
I could be wrong but I think all the BBC One network bulletins today (from Breakfast through to the 10) had all of their headline captions on one line. Someone will correct me if not. Don't know if that applies to the News Channel throughout the day as well.

Not sure if it was a conscious decision but I do agree that they look "tidier" when kept to one line, especially given their size.


I noticed that. Not sure which I prefer. I understand the two line version as it's a bit more consistant with the website and harks back to newspaper headlines.
#skillsforlife
Moz5,419 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Wales Today
One thing that irritates me now, not just with BBC news, but with most news channels now including a pointless big bug to display the title of the show we are watching.

Originally a very American thing now it seems pretty common everywhere, World News adapted it many years ago now but the BBC is an outlet which I didn’t think would introduce such (pointless) thing imo.

How hard is it to push epg button remote if it it really concerns you what news programme you’re watching.


I like those.
#skillsforlife
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gordonthegopher gave kudos
the eye3,556 posts since 19 Jan 2005
BBC World
One thing that irritates me now, not just with BBC news, but with most news channels now including a pointless big bug to display the title of the show we are watching.

Originally a very American thing now it seems pretty common everywhere, World News adapted it many years ago now but the BBC is an outlet which I didn’t think would introduce such (pointless) thing imo.

How hard is it to push epg button remote if it it really concerns you what news programme you’re watching.
d
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chris and Brekkie gave kudos
TedJrr187 posts since 11 Sep 2005
Anglia (East) Look East
One thing I don't understand is why no one thought to keep a copy of what coincidentally began 50 years ago today, the Apollo 11 moon landing coverage. I know a lot of recordings were wiped because it was thought they would be of no value after their first or second broadcast (no home video and no UK Gold at the time) but it seems like it would have been pretty clear even then that it would be an historic broadcast.


Faked moon landings in 405 lines?!

It was allegedly wiped by LWT because NASA possessed higher resolution footage for future use.


Most of the footage you see today is film, and quite good quality, that was obviously brought back and not seen during the mission itself . The live footage as seen on BBC and ITN’s coverage at the time is very poor quality, because it was a low bandwidth link. Required viewing for further info is the Oz movie, The Dish


https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/WEC-Engineer-3-1968.pdf

The camera ran at 10 frames/sec with an upper bandwidth of 500 kc/s and 300 lines/frame. Interesting that they mention a second mode with 1280 lines/sec at 5/8 of a frame a second. I wonder if the second mode was ever used?

https://history.nasa.gov/alsj/TM-X55492.pdf

The schema for the unified-S-band inbound and outbound transmissions. Note that many of the near-earth ground stations are at British/Australian locations, but not alas Jersey. That would have been a thing!
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Markymark gave kudos
Joe6,519 posts since 9 Oct 2005
Meridian (South) South Today
I think some people fail to comprehend the difficulty in getting consistent graphics across so many different pieces of equipment. I work on motion and static graphics regularly and trying to create convincing solutions for different software is hard enough, let alone different pieces of hardware of different ages in different parts of the country. (I would imagine) you cannot simply ‘load on’ graphics from somewhere else. I think that this becomes clear as soon as you do anything remotely similar.
10
Markymark6,728 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Hasn't it already been said Channel had no quad equipment? So they would have been restricted to film.


It's been said loads of times yes !! The only VT facilities they had in 1979, were low band U Matic for news use, any programming on tape would have been supplied on 2 Inch Quad format. (B and C Format 1 inch had only just launched in 76, very few broadcasters were using it in anger, and in any case way out of financial reach at that time for Channel)
James Vertigan3,212 posts since 2 Jun 2001
London London
Meanwhile a bit more recently, in March 2012, thanks to ITV’s regional news cutbacks, viewers as far west as Cornwall were treated to news from as far east as Kent thanks to a power cut knocking out the gallery of ITV in Bristol.



Note Sangeeta Bhabra saying “hello” to Vanessa (Cuddeford) and Ian (Axton) - clearly hadn’t been told it was Bob Cruwys in Ian’s place that day.
Markymark6,728 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
One thing I don't understand is why no one thought to keep a copy of what coincidentally began 50 years ago today, the Apollo 11 moon landing coverage. I know a lot of recordings were wiped because it was thought they would be of no value after their first or second broadcast (no home video and no UK Gold at the time) but it seems like it would have been pretty clear even then that it would be an historic broadcast.


Faked moon landings in 405 lines?!

It was allegedly wiped by LWT because NASA possessed higher resolution footage for future use.


Most of the footage you see today is film, and quite good quality, that was obviously brought back and not seen during the mission itself . The live footage as seen on BBC and ITN’s coverage at the time is very poor quality, because it was a low bandwidth link. Required viewing for further info is the Oz movie, The Dish