Catchup: all posts in the last 24 hours

139 posts, most recent first

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Footballer49 posts since 19 Aug 2016
From early DigiGuide listings, it looks as though Gillette Soccer Saturday will be broadcast on FOUR channels from this coming football season - Sky Sports Premier League, Sky Sports Football, Sky Sports News and Sky 1. I am a football fan, but that's a bit much!

It's only on three channels in Ireland, because we get extra Premier League games on the Premier League channel.
Charles461 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World
confirm rights.


Excellent point! I was going to mention that but didn't want to drone on too much. I also know some places are much more concerned about rights clearance (Fox, surprisingly!) than others (CNN). A lot of it too also depends on how cozy of this relationship really is between CBS and the BBC.

To be honest, I am not sure to what extent video sharing is even available through ENPS. I know it was mostly made for the BBC and is (in my opinion) a very clunky piece of software with a lot of capability and scalability built into it —perhaps too much, even. In the one place where I used ENPS, it was not set up to do very much, and video from our sister stations was not set up to be viewable through it — we had to use a different web client for it. Even viewing our own in-house video through ENPS was a bit of a pain, but that's another story. We could look at each others' rundowns and copy and paste stories, but the video links would always be broken, and even the graphics didn't work despite all of us using the same playout systems and graphics package.

I was also going to add that you can also share video by putting it on a satellite, rolling on it, and having the receiving party simply record it, but that's really only necessary in like a breaking news situation or when you need the video for broadcast very soon. I doubt they'd do that for a package about rediscovered moon rocks.
James Vertigan3,015 posts since 2 Jun 2001
London London
From early DigiGuide listings, it looks as though Gillette Soccer Saturday will be broadcast on FOUR channels from this coming football season - Sky Sports Premier League, Sky Sports Football, Sky Sports News and Sky 1. I am a football fan, but that's a bit much!
noggin12,343 posts since 26 Jun 2001
The partnership started the day of the announcement. I'm sure there's still a lot of things to work out about how it'll work but sending a package over is hardly a sign of them 'hurrying up'.


If the deal works anything like the ABC one did, BBC News may well have access to a CBS server that has all their packages on, and simply selects them for export them to their own playout system.


It is possible (and quite common) to set up newsroom systems to access other servers from other stations/newsrooms, though I'm not sure how fast they can set them up. CBS News uses ENPS (though I think the O&Os use iNEWS — not sure whether the two systems can interact very much) and BBC News uses ENPS (for now), so it'd be pretty seamless to look at each others' rundowns and video (in theory!). If all that is set up, and set up for maximum ease of use, then a BBC producer could snoop into CBS' rundowns, copy and paste the story, and download the video through ENPS or another system like BitCentral in about 15-20 seconds, all without any communication between that producer and someone at CBS.

If all of that is not set up yet, then at the very least, after planning meetings, CBS and BBC's respective assignment desks are most certainly emailing each other lists of stories that their correspondents are assigned for that day and for when they are slated to air or be finished. A BBC producer could then email CBS and request the story if he or she wants to run it, and then it would be delivered via a more manual way by emailing the script and uploading the video to an FTP server.

TL;DR: it's possible BBC and CBS have already set up their newsroom systems to talk to each other, but even if they haven't, there are more manual ways of still sharing content immediately.


I'd be surprised if the video sharing were integrated at the ENPS level. You'd almost certainly do it from a separate system so you had full metadata and rights information that ENPS probably doesn't present in a running order view. Not all content CBS have in their rundowns will be shareable - as the BBC and CBS will have different contracts with third party providers.

If they have server sharing in place - I'd expect it to either be a web-based system, or possibly even still arbitrated by a human at each end to confirm rights.
Charles461 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World
The partnership started the day of the announcement. I'm sure there's still a lot of things to work out about how it'll work but sending a package over is hardly a sign of them 'hurrying up'.


If the deal works anything like the ABC one did, BBC News may well have access to a CBS server that has all their packages on, and simply selects them for export them to their own playout system.


It is possible (and quite common) to set up newsroom systems to access other servers from other stations/newsrooms, though I'm not sure how fast they can set them up. CBS News uses ENPS (though I think the O&Os use iNEWS — not sure whether the two systems can interact very much) and BBC News uses ENPS (for now), so it'd be pretty seamless to look at each others' rundowns and video (in theory!). If all that is set up, and set up for maximum ease of use, then a BBC producer could snoop into CBS' rundowns, copy and paste the story, and download the video through ENPS or another system like BitCentral in about 15-20 seconds, all without any communication between that producer and someone at CBS.

If all of that is not set up yet, then at the very least, after planning meetings, CBS and BBC's respective assignment desks are most certainly emailing each other lists of stories that their correspondents are assigned for that day and for when they are slated to air or be finished. A BBC producer could then email CBS and request the story if he or she wants to run it, and then it would be delivered via a more manual way by emailing the script and uploading the video to an FTP server.

TL;DR: it's possible BBC and CBS have already set up their newsroom systems to talk to each other, but even if they haven't, there are more manual ways of still sharing content immediately.