Catchup: all posts in the last 24 hours

131 posts, most recent first

123456
buster1,762 posts since 15 Mar 2006
London London
They did, for both US trips, offer free tickets to any UK viewers who were there on the dates of the show. How many took them up on the offer I don’t know but they New York audience at least seemed to be pretty well versed in the way the show works
fanoftv8,111 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
The novelty war off back in January for me.


I know what you mean. For years I’ve adored TV presentation, and you’d think that having a new ident weekly would be a dream, but they generally don’t interest me. Whether this is because they’re a created piece that doesn’t create a good ident, lacks a memorable musical accompaniment or for another reason, I can’t quite work it out.
1
DeMarkay gave kudos
itsrobert6,291 posts since 23 Mar 2001
Granada North West Today
Of course, it led to the occasion in the wake of 9/11 when Michael Buerk presented alongside Gavin Esler on the News 24 set! That was an incredible rarity!

EDIT: In fact, I uploaded a video of it several years ago. It's an old-style Real Player video file but it's playable in VLC media player if you have it.

https://up.metropol247.co.uk/itsrobert/BBC%20News%20Special%20(Michael%20Buerk%20%20Gavin%20Esler).rm


I've uploaded it on to YouTube for ease. I've quoted you in the description as the original uploader. I hope you don't mind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sNmvTv8MVM


Interesting that it's a News 24 special, but had the 'World' opening. I'm assuming World produced it?

No, that would have been News 24 produced as it came from N8. At the time, generic bulletins used a slightly different version of the standard BBC World opening titles. If I remember correctly, the World version had "WORLD" spinning around in the background whereas the generic ones had more city names. The ones seen in that clip would have been the generic version but with the world "SPECIAL" added. They never used the News 24 titles on simulcasts, for obvious reasons. Before these generic/World titles were launched in April 2000, the overnight bulletins actually used to use the generic BBC1 news titles! That would have been after the News 24 rebrand in October 1999.
Mike W4,896 posts since 30 Apr 2006
London London
What’s really annoying over the Pennines they have proper modern 21st century facilities yet we are left with 90s technology in Yorkshire, it’s a joke.

The whole English regions thing is a joke, but the argument is would HD improve the content, probably not. 15 or so times the cost of Plymouth’s Tech upgrade - is it worth it when the corporation is trying to save money?
Oh it's such a perfect day, I'm glad I spent it with you...
Josh930 posts since 21 Dec 2014
When watching films on channels like Channel 5 and ITV2, I notice they almost always interrupt them halfway through for news or something similar. But, why? I've never understood the need for this or why they do it.
My tweet was read out on BBC Four's Eurovision coverage and Rylan Clark-Neal replied to it. That's all.
Rkolsen2,754 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I don't think there's a chief newscaster in the same way you get say on the US networks - when there's a big breaking news story on CNN for example the duty presenter will often be thrown off air so that somebody like Wolf Blitzer or Chris Cuomo will anchor. Which always feels unnecessary to me - surely you should trust whoever is on duty to be able to deliver breaking news especially if it's their usual slot.

Whereas with the UK news channels most of the time whoever is on duty is trusted with the breaking news (with sometimes a more senior presenter joining if they were meant to be on shortly after anyway or the World News presenter joining if BBC News & BBC World News are simulcasting)


I don't think there's a chief newscaster in the same way you get say on the US networks - when there's a big breaking news story on CNN for example the duty presenter will often be thrown off air so that somebody like Wolf Blitzer or Chris Cuomo will anchor. Which always feels unnecessary to me - surely you should trust whoever is on duty to be able to deliver breaking news especially if it's their usual slot.

Whereas with the UK news channels most of the time whoever is on duty is trusted with the breaking news (with sometimes a more senior presenter joining if they were meant to be on shortly after anyway or the World News presenter joining if BBC News & BBC World News are simulcasting)

A lot of times the titles are just so they don’t have to pay people more in the US. Kind of like how at some large corporations after two years you’re automatically the VP of something.

I don’t watch CNN or Fox News so I can’t speak for them. But MSNBC when there's breaking news they’ll run with whomever is available at the time. For preplanned events like the Mueller hearings they’ll use Brian Williams, for political events it’s usually him and Rachel Maddow as they are the faces of the network.

During breaking news on the networks ABC, CBS and NBC ideally they would like their main anchors to anchor breaking news or special reports but sometimes they aren’t available and you have to go on air with whomever there. Usually if it’s before 12pm they use morning show anchor and after 12 pm it’s the evening news anchor. ABC News is a special case because although George Stephanopoulos is the morning anchor his contract is the chief anchor and is supposed to be the “face”. Apparently it’s causing rifts between him and David Muir (the evening anchor) that according to FTVLive contracts are being rewritten.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
harshy6,167 posts since 24 Mar 2001
What’s really annoying over the Pennines they have proper modern 21st century facilities yet we are left with 90s technology in Yorkshire, it’s a joke.
Markymark6,856 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

Would that have been an issue in 1979? The transmitters were switched off every night and always came back on. Probably more of a issue with the older 405 line ones too

It was an issue years later once things went 24 hours. I remember being told that when the original BBC UHF transmitters were replaced they had trouble turning the outgoing ones off as the switches that once were used every night hadn't been used for years and wouldn't turn off. They had to turn the main breakers off instead


I'm presuming that the worry was a prolonged switch off rather than overnight. Some equipment would have been live during the overnight closure, heating circuitry etc. especially on the high powered ones. A complete shutdown would be different.

The risk of damage occurred if the Klystron beam current was applied before the heaters had done their work, they were full of interlocks to prevent this. I'll ask someone in the know whether the heaters were left on permanently