Catchup: all posts in the last 24 hours

117 posts, most recent first

12345
dvboy8,509 posts since 11 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
There is no money to be made on late night television anymore. Not with the competition of hundreds of digital channels and on demand services. And needless to say advertisers won't pay for their adverts to be broadcast to seven viewers at crazy o' clock in the morning.

That's why the terrestrial channels opt for repeats, news or Roulette which will at least make a bit of money.
it's a bit disappointing to get to 4am on a quiet nightshift and discover that your viewing options amount to some rolling news or a three-year-old signed repeat of Location Location Location . I appreciate there's no advertising revenue at that time of the morning, but do channels really incur much of a cost by showing more repeats - even if it's just what was on earlier?


I agree I have long argued that they should repeat prime time overnight to give people a second chance to catch it or record it at least. You see more of it further up the EPG but it's strange that the most popular channels don't.
Skygeek852 posts since 5 Feb 2014
London London
It was recently said that Gamal had appeared everywhere apart from Sky News Tonight and never presented from Millbank. Well he's presenting from Westminster now and Sky News Tonight, but his delivery seems different,

No surprise Sophy was missing, she's looked a little ill quite often the last few weeks, I wonder when she is on maternity leave, since that was the last SROS I assume she may already be?

He actually has, and unusually, even co-pres'd with Boulton back when SNT was double-headed.
I sometimes speak ABOUT my employer, although not FOR them.
1
London Lite gave kudos
ttt266 posts since 15 Aug 2015
It was once a novelty, so much so it had its own branding and programmes. Nowadays, so many channels run for 24 hours, it's not special anymore. To echo previous posts, there's no money in it. That's why it was invented in the first place, because the suits reckoned where was money to be made from an audience who had nothing to watch once all the channels had closed down.


I'm not sure there ever was money in it.

The reason ITV had branding for it was mainly due to cross-regional presentation. Several companies were not bothered with it, the aforementioned Granada as well as Tyne Tees among other smaller companies who brought it in on a trial basis, and were ready to pull the plug. It was only the threat of a national night franchise that bounced some companies into action. TTT remained sceptical and stopped selling advertising after 2am within a couple of years, effectively just leaving the station unmanned after this time (NT fell off the air completely on at least one occasion and nothing was done about it until around an hour later).


If said nighttime franchise came to fruition though, why would the regions want to prevent that from happening if there was no money to be made?


It was a land-grab as far as they were concerned.

There was money to be made in the earlier part of the night, which is where any new franchise would be wanting to make their money also. Many ITV companies had started to broadcast up to 2 or 3 in the morning -- larger stations were just about profitable to 3am, smaller ones would have an earlier cut-off point.

If the IBA decided to start the franchise at, say, 12am (not an unreasonable time to start) then the regional companies would lose an hour or two of profitable advertising time.

But the rest of the night was a desert for advertising. Then as now.

Hence the like of TTT just effectively closing down at 2am and leaving the NT stream running. TTT had been quite vocal on the subject during 1987; when they started running JobFinder overnight they stated that they had no plans to introduce a night time service, and in 1988 when Night Time did start they went on record as saying it would be canned if unprofitable after 6 months.
Last edited by ttt on 24 July 2017 10:27pm
Mof2 posts since 23 Apr 2017 new member
London London
On a regular weekly Golf event, any camera might have two or more positions on the course, so would be de-rigged at the end of each day.
On a large event like the open, there would be many cameras left rigged overnight, as there many more of them, and fewer need to move.
VMPhil7,467 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
It's unbelieveable really that in the talk of it moving to TV Centre and then returning to ITV Studios in 5 years or so that the assumption is the show will still be around, something you couldn't have said - dare I say it - pre-Piers Morgan.


It's interesting how this perception that Morgan has saved the show has come about. He joined in late 2015 and had no effect on ratings whatsoever. In early 2016, there was a slight increase but there was nowhere near the supposed uplift we kept hearing about. The actual ratings were still in the 600k region - far too close to what Daybreak V2 was getting. More recently, there has been an increase and a few 20% shares, but the gap is not closing between GMB and Breakfast.

What's arguably more important is that ITV have the tabloid press on side, something which the end of GMTV and Daybreak never had.

I don't think anyone is arguing that there has been a ratings surge. But the change of perception in the media, from the lows of 'Daybroke' to seeing positive articles about the ratings (despite the actual ratings not changing much), is quite remarkable. It shows that ITV have managed to find a voice in the breakfast TV space after years of constant changes. And they can build upon that to actually increase the ratings.


And again, I stress that I don't like Piers Morgan myself at all.
1
GMc gave kudos
Aaron_2015743 posts since 11 Mar 2015
Westcountry Spotlight
It's unbelieveable really that in the talk of it moving to TV Centre and then returning to ITV Studios in 5 years or so that the assumption is the show will still be around, something you couldn't have said - dare I say it - pre-Piers Morgan.


It's interesting how this perception that Morgan has saved the show has come about. He joined in late 2015 and had no effect on ratings whatsoever. In early 2016, there was a slight increase but there was nowhere near the supposed uplift we kept hearing about. The actual ratings were still in the 600k region - far too close to what Daybreak V2 was getting. More recently, there has been an increase and a few 20% shares, but the gap is not closing between GMB and Breakfast.

What's arguably more important is that ITV have the tabloid press on side, something which the end of GMTV and Daybreak never had.