« Topics
1234567
paul_hadley1,485 posts since 19 Sep 2006
London London
As the old thread has been archived, here's a new one. Smile

Following in the footsteps of Dave, Gold (yes the repeats channels) has commissioned a new series - Yes, Prime Minister is coming back.

Press release:

Yes, Prime Minister resumes office in coalition with Gold after 24 year hiatus



29 MARCH 2011, LONDON - UKTV’s flagship comedy channel, Gold, has commissioned the return of Yes, Prime Minister (6 x 40 mins) in a brand new series which will see the Rt. Hon Jim Hacker back in office as PM, leading a coalition government confronting the greatest economic crisis in a generation, with European economies going down the toilet, a tempting energy deal from an unusual source, a leadership crisis with his coalition partners, a Scottish independence referendum and the greatest moral dilemma he has ever faced.

The lauded satire, with new episodes produced by BBC Productions exclusively for Gold, will return in a contemporary setting, scripted by the original writing team, Jonathan Lynn and Antony Jay, and based on their hit play. This is the first commission to follow Gold’s announcement that it will inject “double-digit millions” into original content as it seeks to add to its ‘crown jewels of comedy’ schedule in 2012, its 20th year on air.



The ultimately powerful but beleaguered Prime Minister Jim Hacker - assisted by his impenetrably loquacious advisor Sir Humphrey Appleby and Principal Private Secretary, Bernard Woolley - were last seen on screen in 1988 in the BAFTA winning series which was, famously, the favourite comedy of then incumbent Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher. The series garnered high critical acclaim and influenced latter satirical writers and performers such as Stephen Fry and Armando Iannucci.



UKTV’s Director of Commissioning, Jane Rogerson commented, “The political landscape in Britain today is the perfect setting for Yes, Prime Minister to return. I’m thrilled that Gold has enticed Jonathan Lynn and Antony Jay to pen a brand new series, and can’t wait to see this constitutional treasure back on screens across the country.”



Steve North, General Manager, Gold, added, “Gold is making a great investment into iconic and original British programming and what better place to start than with the timely return of the nation’s greatest satire: Yes, Prime Minister. I’m a huge fan of the original and it’s a real treat to be able to bring this utterly brilliant series to a whole new generation”.



Mark Freeland, Head of BBC In-House Comedy said “The much extended tour of Yes Prime Minister in theatres up & down the country proved that this iconic comedy has lost none of its satirical bite. The one liners hit home like the crack of the Whip. BBC In House Comedy is delighted to team up with Gold to bring this classic back to our screens with all new episodes”.



Yes Prime Minister has been commissioned by UKTV’s Director of Commissioning, Jane Rogerson, and ordered by Gold’s General Manager, Steve North. Executive Producer for Gold will be Sarah Fraser.


For more information, please contact:
Zo¸ Clapp, Head of Communications – 020 7299 6259 / zoe.clapp@uktv.co.uk

Laura McTurk, Publicity Manager, Entertainment, 020 7299 6261 / laura.mcturk@uktv.co.uk

@uktv_press


Also, the Watch website has finally been updated with the new branding - http://uktv.co.uk/watch/homepage/sid/6784
Last edited by paul_hadley on 29 March 2012 2:02pm - 2 times in total
Brekkie26,910 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
After the events of the last couple of days they might as well just commission a documentary on the current lot and call it Dads Army.

A nice move by Gold - any original content on digital channels has to be encouraged, and I'd like to see a similar rule here to what is in place in Australia which effectively forced any digital channel to commit 10% of it's budget to original programming.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
WillPS
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
GOLD is one of a handful of 'exceptions to the rule' where I'd actually prefer to see them obtaining more repeat programming than commissioning their own.

I noticed the Dave/Watch/GOLD/Good Food holding slide used between infomercials in downtime is still using the old Watch logo, but then the Home/Blighty/Really slide is still using the old (blue) Home logo which they changed last year so perhaps this will remain for some time.
Jon6,359 posts since 11 Apr 2005
Central (West) Midlands Today
After the events of the last couple of days they might as well just commission a documentary on the current lot and call it Dads Army.

A nice move by Gold - any original content on digital channels has to be encouraged, and I'd like to see a similar rule here to what is in place in Australia which effectively forced any digital channel to commit 10% of it's budget to original programming.


But that would adversely effect channels like Challenge to remain profitable and in business. But would do no damage to TV shopping channels, which are mess less beinfical TV viewers.

If a channel can make homegrown programming profitable, they'd be doing it anyway?

I could see some logic informing that for Digital Terrestrial channels, but not those on Sky and Virgin only. And it would lead to channels like Challenge coming off Freeview and probably closing all together.
David
I'd like to see a similar rule here to what is in place in Australia which effectively forced any digital channel to commit 10% of it's budget to original programming.

I could see some logic informing that for Digital Terrestrial channels, but not those on Sky and Virgin only. And it would lead to channels like Challenge coming off Freeview and probably closing all together.


More likely they would find a way to stick to the letter of the law but not the spirit of it. Look at Challenge's attempt at audio description. On some programmes (e.g Blockbusters) it involves little more than a description of the opening titles and then after 12 minutes of saying nothing, just saying "End of Part One". Beneficial to no one.

When Konnie Huq appeared on an old episode of Blockbusters, I'm sure we all expected the audio description to say something like "OMG! It's Konnie Huq". That didn't happen. They remained silent throughout. Yet this probably counts towards Challenge's quota of AD programming. I'm sure there would be similar ways to spend the 10% without actually spending it too.
Brekkie26,910 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
After the events of the last couple of days they might as well just commission a documentary on the current lot and call it Dads Army.

A nice move by Gold - any original content on digital channels has to be encouraged, and I'd like to see a similar rule here to what is in place in Australia which effectively forced any digital channel to commit 10% of it's budget to original programming.


But that would adversely effect channels like Challenge to remain profitable and in business. But would do no damage to TV shopping channels, which are mess less beinfical TV viewers.

If a channel can make homegrown programming profitable, they'd be doing it anyway?

I could see some logic informing that for Digital Terrestrial channels, but not those on Sky and Virgin only. And it would lead to channels like Challenge coming off Freeview and probably closing all together.

I think the Aussie rule just applies to channels showing scripted content so they can't rely on imports and repeats, but I don't think 10% would be a big ask for Challenge (especially with Sky now behind it).
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
62305818,566 posts since 19 Aug 2005
STV Central Reporting Scotland
After the events of the last couple of days they might as well just commission a documentary on the current lot and call it Dads Army.

A nice move by Gold - any original content on digital channels has to be encouraged, and I'd like to see a similar rule here to what is in place in Australia which effectively forced any digital channel to commit 10% of it's budget to original programming.


But that would adversely effect channels like Challenge to remain profitable and in business. But would do no damage to TV shopping channels, which are mess less beinfical TV viewers.

If a channel can make homegrown programming profitable, they'd be doing it anyway?

I could see some logic informing that for Digital Terrestrial channels, but not those on Sky and Virgin only. And it would lead to channels like Challenge coming off Freeview and probably closing all together.

I think the Aussie rule just applies to channels showing scripted content so they can't rely on imports and repeats, but I don't think 10% would be a big ask for Challenge (especially with Sky now behind it).


Challenge has always made new content, since it appeared in 15 years ago, it just been the last 2-3 years with tight budget that nothing new was produced.
Is the next post dreaded?
Brekkie26,910 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
That is why focusing any quota on the budget rather than a certain number of hours is the best way to implement it. If you told a channel like Challenge they have to fill say an hour a day of original content they'll do it as cheaply as possible. Put it as part of the budget instead and they'll spend it more wisely and probably go for fewer bigger productions in order to boost the channels image.

Anyhow, we digress. Getting vaguely back on topic a few years on from the infamous rebrand, do we think UKTV made the right move? It certainly worked for Dave, but what about the rest of their portfolio?
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
Jonny3,821 posts since 27 Nov 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Anyhow, we digress. Getting vaguely back on topic a few years on from the infamous rebrand, do we think UKTV made the right move? It certainly worked for Dave, but what about the rest of their portfolio?

Fittingly, it's been a mixed bag. On the whole, the channels look a damn sight better than in their final UKTV incarnations. Whilst some are still easily forgotten (Really, Blighty) others have developed strong, visual identities and niches, setting them apart in the mass of the EPG chaff (Yesterday, Eden, Good Food).

Unfortunately, the one major disaster has been a biggy: Watch/Gold. The mistake of course was turning Gold into purely classic comedy when a more modern mix channel, perhaps combined with a reborn Gold Classics/2, would've maintained some much needed familiarity. Watch remains such a bland proposition, looking like a Sky executive's fantasy BBC One schedule the majority of the time.
youtube