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VMPhil7,051 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Bit of a turn up for the books this one, seeing as how few people have presented this programme in its history. The BBC are completely revamping Crimewatch, which may explain why it's been off air for so long. In the Telegraph tomorrow (or now, on the Internet):

Quote:
As a passionate cyclist with a penchant for handing over videos of dangerous drivers to the police, Jeremy Vine already has a background in amateur crime-fighting.

Now the BBC presenter is to step-up his campaign for justice, when he takes up the reins as the host of Crimewatch later this year.

The corporation will announce today that Vine, who hosts a popular early afternoon Radio 2 show, is to take over from Kirsty Young at the helm of a revamped version of the BBC One programme.

Tina Daheley will present alongside Vine, whose helmet cameras helped land one errant motorist with a £3,200 fine, will be joined on the show by Tina Daheley, a journalist whose role at the BBC includes reading the news on Radio 1.

The new series of Crimewatch, which will air on BBC One in September, is to be given a regular weekly slot for the first time since the programme was first broadcast, in 1984.

Each episode will be broadcast live from the location of the main crime featured on the show that week, with detectives on hand to walk viewers through how the incident unfolded.

Joe Mather, the executive editor of Crimewatch, said the show was the “purest form of public service broadcasting”, and had been overhauled to try to entice viewers away from on-demand services such as Netflix.

He said: “It has been a fixture for 32 years, but the way we do it has changed very little. The regular slot is a game-changer for us. We will be able to update on appeals far more quickly, and show people that their calls really do make a difference.

“The intent is to solve serious crime. Nowadays, with audiences moving over to Netflix, a big live event programme like Crimewatch, which needs audience participation, is something unique and special at a time when broadcasters are finding it hard to make shows that viewers need to tune in to live.

“Filming on location will emphasise our joint purpose with the police and the viewers. We want to show people that these crimes are real. This happened somewhere. It could be where you live.”

Crimewatch is known for its low turnover of presenters, with both Young, and previous host Fiona Bruce, staying for seven years on the show. Mather said the delay in announcing a replacement for Young, who quit last December, had been because “we wanted to be absolutely sure that we had the right person to see it through its new incarnation”.

Vine has spoken of his guilt at “submerging” the police in films of wayward drivers, but said he was told by officers, “keep them coming, we’ll bust them all”.

The presenter said: “I grew up watching Crimewatch. It is one of the most powerful programmes the BBC has ever broadcast with the power to change and save lives, and of course, to solve crimes.

"To present it is a great honour and with this new format Crimewatch will be even more at the heart of the BBC One schedule.”

Daheley added: “Young people often suffer most from crime, so I’m especially keen to use my journalistic skills and experience engaging young audiences at Radio 1 to make sure they feel part of the new look show.”


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/08/04/jeremy-vine-to-become-new-crimewatch-presenter/

(Do we have to compare everything to Netflix now? Even Crimewatch?)
Last edited by VMPhil on 4 August 2016 11:36pm
Brekkie26,894 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
I find that press release a bit off really - somehow gloating about being at major crime scenes rather than being about getting justice for the victims.

The amatuer crime fighting cyclist angle isn't adding to the credibility either - Jeremy Vine probably suffering from the Kaplinsky effect of an experienced journalist being tarnished with the Strictly brush, and hence not taken as seriously as perhaps he should. The virtual environments he's in on Election/Referendum nights only add to that image.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
1
Stedixon359 posts since 28 Nov 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
I find that press release a bit off really - somehow gloating about being at major crime scenes rather than being about getting justice for the victims.

The amatuer crime fighting cyclist angle isn't adding to the credibility either - Jeremy Vine probably suffering from the Kaplinsky effect of an experienced journalist being tarnished with the Strictly brush, and hence not taken as seriously as perhaps he should. The virtual environments he's in on Election/Referendum nights only add to that image.



What are you rattling on about? Jeremy Vine's image hasn't been tarnished by Strictly at all. If that were the case then he would be frowned upon for new work. He's still popular on Radio 2 as well.
3
davidhorman1,576 posts since 8 Mar 2005
Channel Channel Islands
Quote:
Tina Daheley will present alongside Vine, whose helmet cameras helped land one errant motorist with a £3,200 fine, will be joined on the show by Tina Daheley , a journalist whose role at the BBC includes reading the news on Radio 1.


And whose name is Tina Daheley.

Quote:
Joe Mather, the executive editor of Crimewatch, said the show was the “purest form of public service broadcasting”, and had been overhauled to try to entice viewers away from on-demand services such as Netflix.


That reads like an oxymoron to me.
VMPhil7,051 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Quote:
Tina Daheley will present alongside Vine, whose helmet cameras helped land one errant motorist with a £3,200 fine, will be joined on the show by Tina Daheley , a journalist whose role at the BBC includes reading the news on Radio 1.


And whose name is Tina Daheley.

Well, that's my fault, when copying the article into the post. And then tried to fix with an edit but again somehow messed it up without noticing.


Anyway, here's what it actually says

"Vine, whose helmet cameras helped land one errant motorist with a £3,200 fine, will be joined on the show by Tina Daheley, a journalist whose role at the BBC includes reading the news on Radio 1."
scottishtv1,507 posts since 6 Nov 2001
STV Central Reporting Scotland
I didn't see relevance of the Netflix mention either, until they stated that they want people to watch live and contribute to the show as it airs so I can kindof see why they would want to build the publicity around it. However, whenever the main crime been about something local to my area I've always seen advertising in the local papers and on Reporting Scotland in advance of the show airing, so not sure how much of a difference this will make.

I don't want to sound callous, but I also hope that viewers don't get apathetic towards the show with it on every week - the weekly broadcast could have the opposite effect of trying to build attention and get a big audience in to watch it.
Charlie Wells3,548 posts since 26 Nov 2003 Moderator
Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
Interestingly there's currently no news on the BBC media centre website regarding the new series. If it's becoming a weekly show I'm guessing it's likely it may be shortened to a 30 minute programme. I also wonder if they'll borrow elements from the daytime Crimewatch Roadshow.
"Listen, we've all got something to bring to this conversation, but from now on what I think you should bring is silence." - Rimmer
noggin12,074 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Looks like a 4 week run in September, rather than a year round series, with another block next year?

Quote:
Following its September 2016 run, Crimewatch will return to BBC One for its next block of episodes in early 2017.


Quote:
Notes to Editors
- Four episodes of Crimewatch will air weekly from early September on BBC One.
Steve Williams1,816 posts since 1 Aug 2008
Looks like a 4 week run in September, rather than a year round series, with another block next year?


Yes, probably the same number of episodes as before, but concentrated into series. A bit like how Watchdog used to run most of the year, but now runs in series, but the actual running time is pretty much unchanged.