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Rkolsen1,143 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
Rkolsen posted:

The one thing that kind of confuses me as some articles on TVTechnology and others have implied that some or all of the IP production traffic will run with the regular building's IT infrastructure (VOIP, Internet, Computers etc.) while others have not.


It would be foolhardy for a number of reasons, notably, but not exclusively, security not to run the system on anything other than a closed dedicated network. The amount of data you are moving about is immense, and relentless, the core switch has to have plenty of headroom, and non blocking algorithms



That's what I thought - most literature described it that way but some reputable sources implied that it would be both.
Markymark4,397 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Rkolsen posted:

The one thing that kind of confuses me as some articles on TVTechnology and others have implied that some or all of the IP production traffic will run with the regular building's IT infrastructure (VOIP, Internet, Computers etc.) while others have not.


It would be foolhardy for a number of reasons, notably, but not exclusively, security not to run the system on anything other than a closed dedicated network. The amount of data you are moving about is immense, and relentless, the core switch has to have plenty of headroom, and non blocking algorithms



That's what I thought - most literature described it that way but some reputable sources implied that it would be both.


You might use the corporate network for the control layer, but definitely not the 'AV' . Actually it wouldn't even work such is the traffic for even a single video stream
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Charlie Wells3,548 posts since 26 Nov 2003 Moderator
Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
On a Television Centre related note last Sunday whilst my other half was browsing Oxford Street I decided to take a ride along the Central line. Whilst not exactly the best bit of photography (due to not double checking settings) here's a couple taken during the daytime...
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"Listen, we've all got something to bring to this conversation, but from now on what I think you should bring is silence." - Rimmer
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noggin12,075 posts since 26 Jun 2001

I've just read information from the various manufacturers (some of the SMPTE require $) with different standards - you have Sony's NMI, NewTek's NDI, TICO (which seems to have the most backers with Grass Valley, Ross, Ikegami) and AIMs.

Edit : I should state that part of my reasoning for being cautious is that in addition to being a young technology a lot of its single vendor centric. What I'm saying is that it's not like the big iron where you could connect anything from any vendor with an SDI output and in the right format.


Indeed. The so called industry 'plug-fests' will be interesting !

There's a good summary of the choices here

http://www.ibc.org/hot-news/will-ip-sink-or-swim-on-a-lack-of-standards

And this (quite old now) Sony White Paper gives a good overview of what IP offers (and challenges !) over SDI

https://www.xilinx.com/publications/prod_mktg/applications/sonys-ip-live-production-technology.pdf

The one thing that kind of confuses me as some articles on TVTechnology and others have implied that some or all of the IP production traffic will run with the regular building's IT infrastructure (VOIP, Internet, Computers etc.) while others have not.


Depends what you mean by 'infrastructure'. If you mean cabling and apps bay rooms - then yes.

However most broadcast installs will use a mix of split physical networks and VLANs to keep 'business' IT (basic connectivity for office PCs), VOIP (usually on separate VLANs to PCs), broadcast post-gear (desktop edits, graphic workstations moving video around as files), broadcast video (SDI over IP - which is usually 10GigE rather than 1Gig and using real-time protocols) and broadcast control (which is the control network for stuff like routers, up-/down-converters, PGs, multiviewers, colour correctors, networked IP KVMs for remote control of devices with PC-style user interfaces) etc.

There can be bridges enabled between these networks - say by implementing shared access to storage (so business IT can access the same networked storage as the post-prod IT systems to allow easy sharing of media) - but the core infrastucture is usually kept as physically and virtually as separate as it can be to increase robustness.

You'll also often find totally isolated (in both physical and logical terms) local networks for some equipment - say connecting a VM mixer top to a crate. (Though in some installs this will be on a broadcast network - so you can upload/download clips and stills to the VM)

Now we're pumping HD-SDI level uncompressed video across networks, you are in the realms of separate, much higher spec, cabling, patches, switches etc. to that required for office PCs and Phones (many of which are still 100Mbs let alone 10GbE) It's still really common to see an office PC connected to a VOIP phone, and then the VOIP phone connected to a floorbox for network connectivty. The PC and Phone are on different VLANs but share a physical connection back to the patch and switch. The inbuilt switch in the phone is often 100Mbs only.
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Rkolsen1,143 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
Thanks all for the replies.

Anyway back to Marky Marks comments at being surprised that BBC Studios installing a Hybrid router instead of all IP infrastructure made me think that sports broadcasters seem to have embraced IP more. In ESPN's Digital Center 2 deployed Evertz's EXE Ip routing platform in conjunction with JPEG 2000 to route 30,000 signals across their building, NBC Sports deployed an Evertz EXE40-VSR 46Tb/s switch and as others mentioned beforehand OB trucks are upgrading as well.

Additionally Fox and ABC have completely transitioned their network programming playout and distribution to the cloud which is uplinked to a satellite for affiliate distribution. It's not quite the same as IP production as they mainly deal with prerecorded content but it's a start.
Inspector Sands10,539 posts since 25 Aug 2004
I suspect it will otherwise they'd have taken down the whole sign. I think it was taken down partially as a symbolic thing but also because it's not a BBC premises again until the studios reopen.
Inspector Sands10,539 posts since 25 Aug 2004
If no one saw it in the Evening Standard... look who's back.

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I love the red colour they've done on the front, much nicer than the blue it had. Based presumably on this artists impression of the centre before it was built:
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Last edited by Inspector Sands on 12 February 2017 3:40pm