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ttt242 posts since 15 Aug 2015
I refer back about 5 years ago, I hope things have changed for the better in this respect in the intervening period.


I've seen some very poor IT wiring standards, seems to derive from the network 'flood wiring' philosophy. Broadcast wiring standards derive from very tight legacy of GPO/BBC/MOD. You can't afford to have sloppy wiring practice in the broadcast world, so IT standards have been raised ( mostly by being adopted by 'broadcast ')


This really only applies to closet switches in branch offices really (and such places do still tend to be an utter mess, mostly due to low-skilled technicians being given half a description for a given task). Modern managed services/ISP/cloud type providers are dealing with complex, shared platforms, where an error in one part of the infrastructure can have catastrophic consequences for multiple customers. Sloppiness is very much something that cannot be tolerated in such an environment; all it takes is one cable to be run to the wrong port, and depending on the configuration the entire DC (and in some cases, multiple sites) can be brought to a halt.
Markymark4,290 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Are patch bays really used any more? When I've seen them in recent installations they never seem to be used. I imagine modern routers have pretty much removed the need for them.


Although it's still good to be able to over patch a dead router to stay on the air with a key camera chain or source, but that's usually done with a secondary device, such as a relay box, or small router. It's very rare these days to totally lose all of a router, they all (should) have back up control boards. Sometimes cameras and primary sources are interleaved
across several input cards. US broadcasters like to do that I'm told ? Audio departments, particularly in the UK, still like to have acres of patching, despite modern desks having a great deal of routing functionality built in. Folk on the European mainland are a little less conservative, and often raise their eyebrows when they get inside UK sound control rooms.
Last edited by Markymark on 16 December 2016 7:47am
Markymark4,290 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
The IT installations I had seen were about 20 years ago. Most of the kit wasn't designed to be mounted in bays, and it lead to everything having a temporary feel to it.

I agree that the bigger installations now can look so much better - now there is so much more of it, it has to be!


The fundamental difference also is traditional broadcast kit is wired from the rear, IT kit is wired from the front. So you end up with cables all over the front of a rack. You can often mount the IT kit set back a little,
to ease that problem, but them to run into another issue, that the kit is often too deep for the rack. These days you're forced to have 1 metre deep racks really. I saw some nice racks in The Netherlands recently, they had about 200mm of space 'outside' the rack strip on each side, that allowed for cable tray etc there. All ganged together to form a cold corridor. Made by Minkels http://www.minkels.com/#
dosxuk3,659 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I saw some nice racks in The Netherlands recently, they had about 200mm of space 'outside' the rack strip on each side, that allowed for cable tray etc there.


Why do that when, as I discovered on an install last week, you can just bolt your cable tray to the rear rack strip, making it impossible to fit anything to the back. Mad
It's spelt AERIAL!
Markymark4,290 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
I saw some nice racks in The Netherlands recently, they had about 200mm of space 'outside' the rack strip on each side, that allowed for cable tray etc there.


Why do that when, as I discovered on an install last week, you can just bolt your cable tray to the rear rack strip, making it impossible to fit anything to the back. Mad


Yes indeed, but with the wider racks I saw, you have loads of 'volume' on each side outside of the actual
rack mounting area to lose cabling. There's then no restriction of the manner you mention front or back. It is a pain when someone has done that, and you come along later and try and fit something deeper. Of course the drawback is fewer racks than usual in a given area
dosxuk3,659 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I saw some nice racks in The Netherlands recently, they had about 200mm of space 'outside' the rack strip on each side, that allowed for cable tray etc there.


Why do that when, as I discovered on an install last week, you can just bolt your cable tray to the rear rack strip, making it impossible to fit anything to the back. Mad


Yes indeed, but with the wider racks I saw, you have loads of 'volume' on each side outside of the actual
rack mounting area to lose cabling. There's then no restriction of the manner you mention front or back. It is a pain when someone has done that, and you come along later and try and fit something deeper. Of course the drawback is fewer racks than usual in a given area


This was actually one of these wider racks, even had mount points at the top and bottom where you could fix a tray, but no, the IT guys had just stuck it on the rear rails.
It's spelt AERIAL!