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Riaz296 posts since 6 Jan 2016
IMO Blue Peter continues to be produced in order to please certain nostalgic individuals and Guardian journalists, as well as ticking certain boxes in the BBC, but it's not a programme that many parents of children ever expect that their children will watch, nor is it ever a programme that they mention in conversation.

Would Blue Peter be unauthentic if the BBC sold it to another TV channel?

A theory I have is that some TV programmes are enjoyed for what they are with the producer being almost immaterial whereas other programmes are so strongly associated with its producer that if they were sold to another producer then they would lose much of there authenticity and public appeal.

Take into account that TV programmes are technically tradeable commodities like any other branded products are.
Larry the Loafer4,227 posts since 2 Jul 2005
Granada North West Today
Where is the line drawn when it comes to 'copyrighting' the format of a TV programme so that a similar programme by another producer requires licensing?


I do wonder how often the Googlebox producers feel compelled to fling lawsuits. I've seen influences of it in adverts and even that stupid Watchdog anniversary programme. Gold are teasing a new show that seems to involve actors and comedians sitting down and watching/discussing Christmas TV specials. Unless it just so happens to be the same producers, surely they're cooking with gas.

Whilst I would agree on your point of the TV adverts, I don't agree about this Gold show. Talking head programmes have been around for years and years, especially on the digital channels and especially at Christmas.

I should point out that I've not seen this trailered myself.


I can't find it online but it has people watching television on couches in living rooms.
Brekkie26,887 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
Studio Lambert are milking the format - there is a current affairs version coming to BBC2. ITV did the same with Come Dine with Me after it was a hit for C4, effectively remaking their own show with minor tweaks to broadcast themselves, but viewers saw through it. It is also one of the non-monetary reasons cited by Love Productions for the Bake Off fiasco - they ripped off the format themselves for a couple of BBC shows and then got upset when the BBC did something they considered to be a rip off themselves, though I think no viewer got Hair and Bake Off mixed up.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
NorthTonight450 posts since 29 Jul 2008
STV North Reporting Scotland
IMO Blue Peter continues to be produced in order to please certain nostalgic individuals and Guardian journalists, as well as ticking certain boxes in the BBC, but it's not a programme that many parents of children ever expect that their children will watch, nor is it ever a programme that they mention in conversation.

Would Blue Peter be unauthentic if the BBC sold it to another TV channel?

A theory I have is that some TV programmes are enjoyed for what they are with the producer being almost immaterial whereas other programmes are so strongly associated with its producer that if they were sold to another producer then they would lose much of there authenticity and public appeal.

Take into account that TV programmes are technically tradeable commodities like any other branded products are.


I'm not sure my parents ever " expected " me to watch Blue Peter but at the time it was there and if it was interesting enough then I'd watch. There was certainly a time just before they left TVC and moved to Salford where it had seem to have lost its way and could have been replaced by any magazine format. Why stop showing it if it's still watched ? It's never going to go back to getting the viewers it did in the 70s / 80s now that we're in a multichannel world. But if it's still working, why get rid of it ? It might never be " trendy " whatever decade you watch it in, but if you watch it now it has moved with the times and is very less stuffy without the presenters trying too hard... Unlike many programmes for young people.
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Riaz296 posts since 6 Jan 2016
In any case, BP was never the cool show to watch as a child. It was seen as the middle class kids show parents expected you to watch, even though I enjoyed elements of the programme.


I'm not sure my parents ever " expected " me to watch Blue Peter but at the time it was there and if it was interesting enough then I'd watch. There was certainly a time just before they left TVC and moved to Salford where it had seem to have lost its way and could have been replaced by any magazine format. Why stop showing it if it's still watched ? It's never going to go back to getting the viewers it did in the 70s / 80s now that we're in a multichannel world. But if it's still working, why get rid of it ? It might never be " trendy " whatever decade you watch it in, but if you watch it now it has moved with the times and is very less stuffy without the presenters trying too hard... Unlike many programmes for young people.


Besides, there are plenty of equivalents of Blue Peter in other countries - RTE's Echo Island was virtually identical.


I think there is some truth to the argument that Blue Peter has an image of being a programme for staid and slightly geeky middle class suburbanites. I doubt that it was ever intended as the coolest or the trendiest of children's programmes from the outset but it was big back in the 1980s and 90s - like Newsround also was. The problem these programmes have faced in recent years is the fragmentation of how kid's get their video fix in after school hours. A significant difference between Blue Peter and Newsround is that Blue Peter is a reasonably easy programme for any producer to clone whereas a Newsround clone will be difficult for any producer without a news gathering infrastructure.

There definitely have been programmes similar to Blue Peter in other countries over the decades. It might not be a format appealing to the American audience but it has been tried out in 'third world' countries due to its relatively low cost of production.
Night Thoughts78 posts since 24 Jan 2016
London London
A lot of kids are shown Newsround in school now. A far cry from the days when adults used to watch it along with their kids (although Newsround did used to pitch three or four years older until about about a decade ago).