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Markymark4,402 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
The BBC and ITV have a system, which is a bit ad hoc, to cope with missing kids don't they?

In terms of things like school closings, that's definitely the province of BBC Local Radio - and everyone knows to tune to it if there is bad weather, and the Breakfast News regional bulletins will include a "For full details of school closures because of the bad weather, check with your BBC Local Radio station".


One thing we could take from US 'local' TV is scrolling captions on network output.

There's no technical reason why the regional BBC centres couldn't have an info ticker on the screen during Breakfast, (and any other time during local emergencies). Rather more difficult for ITV, because of their different network architecture, (they'd have to install gfx engines at Chiswick and Leeds on each regional Tx feed)


Would only work on BBC One SD in England though (and now Plymouth have upgraded it wouldn't splat a PAL footprint on network - apart possibly from Jersey?).


The opting out of analogue sustaining network surely was ditched in all regions shortly after DSO wasn't it ? Surprised

The regions would have to remain in 'soft opt' mode throughout, but other than that no issues surely (apart for HD and possibly Jersey ?)

I suspect the vast majority of viewing of Breakfast is SD, on DVB-T1 only receivers in bedrooms and kitchens. In fact, I'm sceptical anybody watches Breakfast in HD in England given the lack of opt outs, and the fact
BBC 1 HD is hidden away way up the EPG (Thousands of HD equipped viewers are probably still unaware it even exists)
noggin12,075 posts since 26 Jun 2001
The BBC and ITV have a system, which is a bit ad hoc, to cope with missing kids don't they?

In terms of things like school closings, that's definitely the province of BBC Local Radio - and everyone knows to tune to it if there is bad weather, and the Breakfast News regional bulletins will include a "For full details of school closures because of the bad weather, check with your BBC Local Radio station".


One thing we could take from US 'local' TV is scrolling captions on network output.

There's no technical reason why the regional BBC centres couldn't have an info ticker on the screen during Breakfast, (and any other time during local emergencies). Rather more difficult for ITV, because of their different network architecture, (they'd have to install gfx engines at Chiswick and Leeds on each regional Tx feed)


Would only work on BBC One SD in England though (and now Plymouth have upgraded it wouldn't splat a PAL footprint on network - apart possibly from Jersey?).


The opting out of analogue sustaining network surely was ditched in all regions shortly after DSO wasn't it ? Surprised

The regions would have to remain in 'soft opt' mode throughout, but other than that no issues surely (apart for HD and possibly Jersey ?)

I suspect the vast majority of viewing of Breakfast is SD, on DVB-T1 only receivers in bedrooms and kitchens. In fact, I'm sceptical anybody watches Breakfast in HD in England given the lack of opt outs, and the fact
BBC 1 HD is hidden away way up the EPG (Thousands of HD equipped viewers are probably still unaware it even exists)


My point about Plymouth was that, until they upgraded recently, I think they still had a PAL GVG 200 as their mixer (running 16:9 PAL), so putting network on the desk would have added a PAL footprint if it was used for keying tickers.
Markymark4,402 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
The BBC and ITV have a system, which is a bit ad hoc, to cope with missing kids don't they?

In terms of things like school closings, that's definitely the province of BBC Local Radio - and everyone knows to tune to it if there is bad weather, and the Breakfast News regional bulletins will include a "For full details of school closures because of the bad weather, check with your BBC Local Radio station".


One thing we could take from US 'local' TV is scrolling captions on network output.

There's no technical reason why the regional BBC centres couldn't have an info ticker on the screen during Breakfast, (and any other time during local emergencies). Rather more difficult for ITV, because of their different network architecture, (they'd have to install gfx engines at Chiswick and Leeds on each regional Tx feed)


Would only work on BBC One SD in England though (and now Plymouth have upgraded it wouldn't splat a PAL footprint on network - apart possibly from Jersey?).


The opting out of analogue sustaining network surely was ditched in all regions shortly after DSO wasn't it ? Surprised

The regions would have to remain in 'soft opt' mode throughout, but other than that no issues surely (apart for HD and possibly Jersey ?)

I suspect the vast majority of viewing of Breakfast is SD, on DVB-T1 only receivers in bedrooms and kitchens. In fact, I'm sceptical anybody watches Breakfast in HD in England given the lack of opt outs, and the fact
BBC 1 HD is hidden away way up the EPG (Thousands of HD equipped viewers are probably still unaware it even exists)


My point about Plymouth was that, until they upgraded recently, I think they still had a PAL GVG 200 as their mixer (running 16:9 PAL), so putting network on the desk would have added a PAL footprint if it was used for keying tickers.


Ah ! Yes, I'd forgotten that ! I don't think there's any other PAL 'islands' in the regions ?
Mouseboy331,735 posts since 10 Feb 2014
The North American alerts system is multi-layered.
You get Radio alerts.

You also will get tv alerts that are stripped across all the channels (Depending on your multichannel operator. Some are full screen alerts, some as shown above are full screen on every channel.)

Then you get outdoor warning sirens. Some of them have voices that provide instruction on where to go if you are stuck outside in an open area.

Then you mobiles also are pre programmed to give you the EAS Alert as well.

And many people have and constantly urged to have NOAA weather radios. They will wake you up in the night.
I said what I said!
Inspector Sands10,541 posts since 25 Aug 2004
There's no technical reason why the regional BBC centres couldn't have an info ticker on the screen during Breakfast, (and any other time during local emergencies). Rather more difficult for ITV, because of their different network architecture, (they'd have to install gfx engines at Chiswick and Leeds on each regional Tx feed)

That would be the best way to do it at the BBC too, that way it wouldn't need the involvement of the regional centre at all. They could just have some way of adding a caption before the region is coded (they wouldn't necessarily need one gfx engine per region). That way even if Plymuth for example have all gone home an important message could still be broadcast.

I'd imagine for the number of times it would be used it wouldn't be that viable though
HarryB2,008 posts since 1 Nov 2013
Them sirens really are quite frightening, don't think the UK has any sirens like them. Only one I can think of is the siren in Bracknell, Berkshire and its surroundings if someone escapes from Broadmoor Hospital. There is around 13 sirens in the area.

Going so off topic now, but they sounded last year when there was a big thunderstorm, because one of the sirens got struck by lightening Shocked
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-28361659
Steve in Pudsey7,902 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I hear that The Bay, local independent radio station in Lancaster, has been particularly impressive during the floods. They were affected by power cuts, then the ground floor of their building, including the studios, was under water on Saturday night. Their engineer cobbled together an emergency studio (looks like OB style kit) on a higher floor of the building, and have been providing excellent coverage of the situation since they got back on air on Sunday.

For a small station that hasn't got the resources of a big group to fall back on, that's a bloody good effort by all concerned.
Write that down in your copybook now.
3
Markymark4,402 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
There's no technical reason why the regional BBC centres couldn't have an info ticker on the screen during Breakfast, (and any other time during local emergencies). Rather more difficult for ITV, because of their different network architecture, (they'd have to install gfx engines at Chiswick and Leeds on each regional Tx feed)

That would be the best way to do it at the BBC too, that way it wouldn't need the involvement of the regional centre at all. They could just have some way of adding a caption before the region is coded (they wouldn't necessarily need one gfx engine per region). That way even if Plymuth for example have all gone home an important message could still be broadcast.

I'd imagine for the number of times it would be used it wouldn't be that viable though


Well, I was thinking of it being used routinely during breakfast, for 'run of the mill' info. Traffic and travel news
mostly. I saw a number of affiliates doing it in the US recently during the network breakfast shows, (and despite far more frequent local opts than we get on BBC B and GMB)
Rkolsen1,144 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
[quote="Markymark" pid="985528"]
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Well, I was thinking of it being used routinely during breakfast, for 'run of the mill' info. Traffic and travel news
mostly. I saw a number of affiliates doing it in the US recently during the network breakfast shows, (and despite far more frequent local opts than we get on BBC B and GMB)

If I recall correctly all of the NBC Owned stations are hubbed - where all their non news programming is played out similar to ITV but each station controls their schedules. I believe the hub is the location where the tickers for Today are inserted. The hub I believe also has the ability to put up a simple crawl across the screen. I'm not sure how things like school closings are handled - where the graphics are far more complex than a simple text crawl.
TorontoCommons24 posts since 16 May 2014

The EAS is scary as hell. I wonder how things would play out if the MET office were aware a repeat of the 1987 storm was about to hit?


If you think the EAS sound is annoying you should hear the Canadian version:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Le4XGUgucTc

The Canadian version recently launched. And the US is going to require stations to air alerts via text and speech in both English and Spanish soon.


But hey, at least the Canadian version is more up to date with current technology and actually doing its job. America's EAS is basically a dated dialup-esque marketing toy, why isn't it amended?

Is that a real copy of what happens? It looks like a creation in Windows Movie Maker


That's kinda the point here. The developers of the system made a strict design guideline regarding the look and feel of the Canadian EAS system, AlertReady. Colour, font, even the placement of the ticker itself was made uniform. They actually took compatibility and viewer legibility in mind for once, unlike the Americans with their ridiculously fast EAS tickers.
Journalist vs. the Forces of Quality