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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World
"News Director" is the term for the head of the news department in pretty much every market in the US, not just small ones. Also, in Buzzfeed's defense, it is pretty difficult to figure out internal information about the hierarchy of RT. RT was one of the news channels I studied in my undergraduate thesis, and it was pretty much impossible to get any detailed information about RT's funding and internal operations without having to go to secondary sources. For example, you will find almost no information about RT staff or its funding sources anywhere on its website, whereas every other English language news channel has information about their board and finances readily available.
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noggin12,069 posts since 26 Jun 2001
"News Director" is the term for the head of the news department in pretty much every market in the US, not just small ones. Also, in Buzzfeed's defense, it is pretty difficult to figure out internal information about the hierarchy of RT. RT was one of the news channels I studied in my undergraduate thesis, and it was pretty much impossible to get any detailed information about RT's funding and internal operations without having to go to secondary sources. For example, you will find almost no information about RT staff or its funding sources anywhere on its website, whereas every other English language news channel has information about their board and finances readily available.


However a quick look at imdb tells you the person in question is a gallery director...
noggin12,069 posts since 26 Jun 2001
"News Director" is the term for the head of the news department in pretty much every market in the US, not just small ones.

I guess I should have been clearer - "News Director" is a term I associate with regional stations, not network news departments, in the US.

In the UK "News Director" usually refers to a live studio/gallery director working on news output and with news-specific skills.

Quote:

Also, in Buzzfeed's defense, it is pretty difficult to figure out internal information about the hierarchy of RT. RT was one of the news channels I studied in my undergraduate thesis, and it was pretty much impossible to get any detailed information about RT's funding and internal operations without having to go to secondary sources. For example, you will find almost no information about RT staff or its funding sources anywhere on its website, whereas every other English language news channel has information about their board and finances readily available.


True - but the person in question works in the UK, has an imdb entry, and clearly doesn't have the background to be an editorial lead for a UK news operation...
Rkolsen1,130 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
"News Director" is the term for the head of the news department in pretty much every market in the US, not just small ones.

I guess I should have been clearer - "News Director" is a term I associate with regional stations, not network news departments, in the US.

In the UK "News Director" usually refers to a live studio/gallery director working on news output and with news-specific skills.
.

I think in the US the equivalent of News Director would be the Technical Director (the person operating the vision mixer) if your in one of the few stations that are not automated.
noggin12,069 posts since 26 Jun 2001
"News Director" is the term for the head of the news department in pretty much every market in the US, not just small ones.

I guess I should have been clearer - "News Director" is a term I associate with regional stations, not network news departments, in the US.

In the UK "News Director" usually refers to a live studio/gallery director working on news output and with news-specific skills.
.

I think in the US the equivalent of News Director would be the Technical Director (the person operating the vision mixer) if your in one of the few stations that are not automated.

Yep - though here there are news directors who work with separate vision mixers (i.e. people who press the buttons on the vision mixer) too. ITV News, Channel Four News, and for the moment Sky News, and the BBC Persian and Arabic TV services still have a director and separate vision mixer for their main bulletins, but may follow the TD model (with a director pressing their own buttons) for shorter bulletins.


At ITN they even call the combined role used for shorter bulletins a "TD" (which is a relatively rare job title in the UK - though at the BBC the original News 24 gallery positions were described as "Technical Directors" to differentiate them from the existing tradiitonal "Studio Directors" though both roles were combined into the "News Director" role by the early 00s)

The BBC have obviously pursued heavy automation for their domestic output and BBC World News, with News Directors there having to be skilled Mosart operators as well as directors.
<Off Topic - Sorry>
TDs in the US don't really map into a UK gallery role specifically - whether in News or non-News environments. Here the Vision Mixer concentrates purely on cutting the show (and/or screens) whereas in the US a TD is also often involved heavily in crewing and forward planning shows, and in some cases is also responsible for the technical quality of a show, which in the UK an Engineering Manager, Studio Resource Manager or Transmission Manager would do rather than the VM.
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Whataday7,111 posts since 13 Sep 2001
HTV Wales Wales Today
The banks here will normally send a letter like this if the tiniest hint of fraud is detected, hence why they won't discuss the matter anymore as that could be deemed as "tipping off" which is a jailable offence.

Thing is, by broadcasting this to all and sundry it will make it almost impossible to open a new UK account elsewhere....

Love their coverage right now - complaining that free speech has ended. That's rich of them!!! Mr Putin undoubtedly shuffling dodgy cash around...



This is quite misleading - the letter RT quoted has nothing to do with fraud. It's generally sent to account holders that are not using the bank's facilities as the bank would like. For instance, if the account holder only banks the bare minimum in order to keep the account in credit (ie not enough to earn any interest) so it ends up costing the bank more money than it makes from keeping the account open.

It's generally a business decision rather than any accusation of fraud. Fraud would be reported and dealt with through the appropriate channels.