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davidhorman1,576 posts since 8 Mar 2005
Channel Channel Islands
They look more like jumpers than a port, which might serve the purpose of selecting different settings for... some reason I can't think of. That said I did find one quote-of-a-quote-of-a-quote that says it's for uploading different firmware for different manufacturers/providers.
noggin12,074 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Suspect it is a JTAG or similar port for reflashing firmware. Chances are the remote is reasonably generic, and can be flashed with different remote codes for different territories, applications, or boxes. Lots of remote chipsets are quite generic.

Pretty certain my One4All remotes have similar connectors on them. Could well be a way of adding new TV codes (if the remote also can be programmed to control your TV) as time goes by during the manufacturing process, so the same design of remote can be shipped with newer codes over the months/years it is in manufacture.
Rkolsen1,136 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
Suspect it is a JTAG or similar port for reflashing firmware. Chances are the remote is reasonably generic, and can be flashed with different remote codes for different territories, applications, or boxes. Lots of remote chipsets are quite generic.

Pretty certain my One4All remotes have similar connectors on them. Could well be a way of adding new TV codes (if the remote also can be programmed to control your TV) as time goes by during the manufacturing process, so the same design of remote can be shipped with newer codes over the months/years it is in manufacture.


There's the same thing on my Comcast remote.
elmarko614 posts since 27 Jul 2010
STV Central Reporting Scotland
I googled so much and couldn't find anything specific on it. It did look more like jumpers at first but I thought it'd be odd to have those accessible like that.

Right. Maybe time to get the multimeter out and borrow a logic analyser. And learn how to use it...
noggin12,074 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I googled so much and couldn't find anything specific on it. It did look more like jumpers at first but I thought it'd be odd to have those accessible like that.

Right. Maybe time to get the multimeter out and borrow a logic analyser. And learn how to use it...


As dosxuk says - sensible thing is to work out what the chip it is connected to inside is and then have a look around for a datasheet or others who have reverse engineered.

Logic analyser probably only useful if you have actual data being passed through the port (i.e. something plugged into it)