Charles' posts

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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

NBC News, MSNBC, ABC News and others from across the pond

My concern is that if MSNBC does rebrand, it'll damage the impartiality of NBC News as a whole. MSNBC is known as a left-wing, pro Democrats agenda network.

It never used to be like this, but when you have Rachel Maddow and co doing the same as Fox News (with the Republican Party) for them, it is a concern.


I think what distinguishes MSNBC from Fox is that they do separate out the punditry from rolling news. At the very least, although unabashedly leftist, MSNBC is not running a propaganda and misinformation-heavy operation like Fox has been doing since the Bush Administration.


The MSNBC of today is very different from the MSNBC of, say, 2013. There's still mostly left-leaning point of view programming at night, yes, and there's still the political circus that is Morning Joe, but during the day, MSNBC is much more of a rolling news channel again since Andy Lack's return. That's also not to mention that NBC has recently hired away two high profile Fox News personalities in the last few months. The days of filling the entire programming day with DNC-heavy point of view shows from people who were barely even journalists like Ronan Farrow or The Cycle are long over. And last time I checked, NBC/MSNBC isn't the one network that's persona non grata at the White House right now (*cough* CNN *cough*). It's very hard to argue that CNN's programming day doesn't also have a very clear point of view about the orange man in the bad suit right now...
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

International News Presentation: Past and Present


LCI - TF1 Group
CNEWS - Canal+ Group.
Franceinfo - France Télévisions (PSB)
BFMTV - NextRadioTV

International news channel France 24 is also on TNT. (French Freeview).

Thanks. Are all the others available for free?


All are FTA. CNEWS and BFMTV are in HD, Franceinfo is SD on TNT and Fransat, while in HD on pay tv platforms. LCI is SD and used to be behind a paywall before DSO.


And don't forget Lyon-based Euronews!
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

Euronews launching africanews, new euronews identity to come

MSNBC International?


That ship sailed long ago and frankly if they'd actually wanted to have done that, it would have already happened. But the closing of NBC Europe, formerly NBC Super Channel, in 1998 put pay to those plans.


There were earnest plans to distribute MSNBC internationally or to create a separate international channel way back when Microsoft still owned 50% of MSNBC. I don't think it ever got beyond being added to a cable system in Israel, and all of this is about 15 management teams ago, i.e. meaningless today. The low international exposure to NBC, aside from CNBC, is one of the key drivers of this Euronews deal. Even Fox News has more international cable carriage, not even to say anything of Sky's worldwide footprint.
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

Euronews launching africanews, new euronews identity to come


Secondly, Euronews is either great or awful depending on what kind of TV news viewer you are. If you're someone who parks themselves in front of the TV to watch news for an hour or more in one sitting every day, then Euronews is not for you (as long as you're primarily consuming news in English). But if you're a casual news consumer who only watches 15-30 minutes of news in the morning or at night to get caught up to speed with what's happening in the world, then no channel gives you a better, concisely-produced, and comprehensive newscast than Euronews.


I tend to agree with this, but isn't the second group becoming smaller as more and more people get the day's news online? This is, after all, the reason why CNN Headline News essentially shut down and why the ITN (later ITV) News Channel didn't make it with its just-the-facts approach. For better or for worse, the leading news channels, including CNN International and BBC World News, are building their reputations with breaking news, extended analysis, and live interviews -- that is, elements that go beyond the day's headlines.

Can Euronews maintain or even strengthen its brand by going against today's trends? Perhaps, but I have my doubts.


That's why I think that Euronews is well-suited for the digital age. A typical story on Euronews lasts 60-90 seconds and synthesizes good video and sound. In other words, it's a very similar format to the types of videos that AJ+, Buzzfeed, CNN, and the BBC churn out on their social media platforms. And I'd argue that Euronews on TV has at least some variability. The first 10-15 minutes are a swift recap of 8-12 top stories, sure, and then there's No Comment in the back half, but then the rest of the half hour is filled with something different every time. A little repetitive, yes, but not quite to the level of Headline News back in the day when TV Guide would print the newswheel telling you exactly at how many minutes past the hour every hour you could expect to see Dollars and Sense, Sports, etc.
Last edited by Charles on 15 February 2017 8:08am
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

Euronews launching africanews, new euronews identity to come

A few things:

If we're talking about Euronews ratings, then the EBU simulcasts should absolutely be counted. The 6h00 simulcast on France 3 is the channel's only morning news, and it's the only morning news of the big three in France aside from Télématin. I'm not sure how well it does exactly, but the point remains that these simulcasts on national broadcasters are a major source of exposure to Euronews.

Secondly, Euronews is either great or awful depending on what kind of TV news viewer you are. If you're someone who parks themselves in front of the TV to watch news for an hour or more in one sitting every day, then Euronews is not for you (as long as you're primarily consuming news in English). But if you're a casual news consumer who only watches 15-30 minutes of news in the morning or at night to get caught up to speed with what's happening in the world, then no channel gives you a better, concisely-produced, and comprehensive newscast than Euronews. I also think that the Euronews effect of providing a high quality, neutral voice in a local language in many places where the press is often restricted is a great thing (think of the services in Persian, Hungarian, Ukranian, Turkish, etc.)

Thirdly, I think Euronews has done a good job at adding a human touch to the channel in recent years. More correspondents who work directly for Euronews front many of their own reports now, and the mini-shows that run after the main newscast are often studio-based with a regular presenter (albeit dubbed in all the other languages). In a perfect world with an unlimited budget, each language service would have its own on-air presenter team for at least the weekday morning and evening hours. But that would be quite an undertaking, though perhaps one that NBC may want to explore. But it's also not just on TV — Euronews has a big footprint online, where I think the anchorless, clip-driven format works very well. After all, that's what pretty much every news outlet is doing with Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram right now.

It will be interesting to see what NBC wants to do with Euronews. I think it's too early to tell from the press releases what this all means. Does Euronews get NBC branding, peacock and all, along with a cleaned up, commercialized programming strategy? Or is Euronews merely an instrument to provide NBC with more international content? Or will NBC try to start an international edition of MSNBC using resources from CNBC Worldwide and Euronews? Should be interesting, especially considering that there are still 25 other shareholders in Euronews.
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

International News Presentation: Past and Present

From 1965, KNBC's coverage of an in-flight emergency:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gw2RW7xybmU


Extraordinary story, but I doubt it'd get 4'30" these days on an American news bulletin. Ironic that the couple filming in the plane had footage in colour yet the news broadcaster is still monochrome (unless that's just the surviving recording?). I suppose it was extremely uncommon back then for "user generated content" to be available.


Or maybe not. A lot of that reminds me of the Asiana crash, which also happened at SFO a few years ago. That certainly received a lot of coverage. I can't remember what the LA stations did, but they probably had at least a few of their own reporters up there giving live reports. That's probably the closest analogue. Still a lot of coverage, but perhaps a little more visceral and dramatic with live reports, viewer footage, and rinse and repeat for the next report in fifteen minutes.

Of course, a lot has changed since 1965. Air disasters and four engine jets are also far less common, and the great Pan Am is no more.

On that note, here's a nice package from CBS Sunday Morning in 2011 on the 20th anniversary of Pan Am's collapse:

Last edited by Charles on 8 February 2017 10:05am - 2 times in total
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

North American Affilliates/Network Set Design

That's true that there are still some independents/CW affiliates out there that are doing pretty well. But I'd argue that there are special circumstances that make them work. WGN and KTLA each have something that sustain themselves: the Cubs, the juggernaut that is the KTLA Morning News, the Rose Bowl Parade, and viewer habits. KTVK went independent 23 years ago in a time when local television was much more important than today, and having a local owner helped too. Also in that case, the Phoenix stations were mostly switching affiliation rather than having the market fragmented with another new player. Pretty much all of the Phoenix stations were dealing with major shakeups in their affiliations, so it was pretty much a wash at first. KNXV had a pretty weak news department and still does, and Scripps wasn't pouring money into it in the same way NBC poured money into WBTS and KNTV, or how Tribune ramped up WTTV and WXIN.
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

North American Affilliates/Network Set Design

It'll be interesting to see how WHDH fares - they certainly have a lot of news now.

Any word on how WISH in Indianapolis has done since they lost their CBS affiliation a couple of years ago and increased their news output like WHDH is doing?


Apparently not well.

http://www.ibj.com/articles/62179-wish-tv-hires-new-general-manager-in-midst-of-tight-news-environment

Running an independent or a CW/MyTV affiliate with a big news department just doesn't really work even in the largest of markets. The same pattern happens everywhere: no ad revenue from any major shows that people watch leads to fewer resources to do more hours of news, which leads to crap newscasts that nobody would want to watch anyway, which leads to bad talent being hired to replace the many who bolt for better stations, and viewers eventually change habits and tune away because they're not going to tune in just to watch a crap news product. The days of being a quirky independent with a news department that can punch above its own weight with a primetime movie hour every night are long since gone.
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

CNN International

CNN is to launch a version of CNN Money in Switzerland this year. It will be broadcast in English and come from studios in Zurich. It will be carried on cable, IPTV and "free-to-air operators", according to reports, so I assume it might appear on Zattoo Switzerland, for example.
Details: http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/2017/01/22/cnnmoney-switzerland-to-launch-as-countrys-first-national-english-language-business-channel/

A bit random. Why Switzerland? There are lots of bigger markets in Europe such as Germany with a higher number of proficient English speakers.

I do hope eventually they begin an international CNN Money news channel.


CNN allows other broadcasters to license the CNN brand for their own use, sometimes with or without a small financial investment from CNN. There are many countries where this already happens: Indonesia, Philippines, Chile, India, and a few others. Historically, they've been mostly separate editorial operations and contribute very little content to CNN Domestic, International, and .com. If there's a breaking story in those places, they'll probably use their video at first, but CNNI will then send their correspondents to cover it from there. Notice how neither the English nor French press releases say anything about CNN Money Switzerland being a part of CNNI's business shows or using CNNI's lifestyle content.

CNN en Espanol and CNN Mexico are 100% CNN owned and operated, but the rest are almost entirely independent.
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

North American Affilliates/Network Set Design

It looks so jarring to see her on MSNBC. Megyn goes to NBC, Greta on MSNBC, Ed Schultz on RT...maybe one day we'll see the Factor on Al Jazeera? Razz

This has got to be a pretty big deal for MSNBC. I can't think of any other examples of them picking up any big names from Fox.


It's interesting to see that they've gone back to poaching lots of people from other networks with a lot of splash, unlike the practice in the last few years of hiring obscure left-leaning writers, politicos, and academics with not a lot of on-air experience.
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

NBC News, MSNBC, ABC News and others from across the pond

They would not be stupid enough to force affiliates to run it as an additional show. Affiliates would never let NBC have another hour of network daytime programming just that easily, especially after getting back another hour after the fourth hour of the Today show launched.

I think her daytime show will take over the Days of our Lives slot. It was last renewed in February for one year only, and the announcement is pretty coy about as to where her show will land. I smell another programming announcement coming about a month from now.

As it stands, a typical NBC affiliate schedule is this:
4/4:30am: Early Today
4:30/5-7am: local news
7-11am: the Today show
Stations usually run a half hour or full hour of local news at 11am or noon and fill the rest of the afternoon with syndicated programming (Ellen DeGeneres, Extra, etc.) Days of our Lives usually runs at 1 or 2pm for a full hour. Local news picks up again at 4 or 5pm, and NBC Nightly News typically runs at 5:30 or 6:30pm depending on time zone.
NBC primetime then runs from 8-11pm or 7-10pm depending on time zone, and then a half hour of local news follows that before the late night block (The Tonight Show, Late Night, Last Call, and a rerun of Nightly News).
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

North American Affilliates/Network Set Design

Well these are some rough photos from the chief meteorologist of NBC's New Boston station dubbed well NBC Boston. The station broadcasts from WBTS-LD (low power station in Boston), a subchannel on WNEU (NBC's full power Telemundo station with a transmitter in New Hampshire) and on a leased subchannel on religious station WMFP to cover the market fully. The reason for all these stations is because WNEU, which was already owned by NBC, barely covers the northern part of Massachusetts as its based in New Hampshire (which is part of the Boston DMA), WBTS was previously owned by a partner of NBC that previously owned WNEU and continued as a translator of WNEU as WTMU (which barely covers the city) , WMFP was just added for additional coverage. WBTS and WNEU broadcast all the same subchannels in their multiplexes (NBC & Telemundo at 1080i, Cozi and Telexitos in SD widescreen) - just with different numbering schemes while WMFP just carries NBC at 720p.

More to do with the US station acronym policy than your writing style but I read that post and all I see is a collection of letters.


I've been following this story for a while too, and none of it makes sense to me.

The general gist of it is that NBC wanted to own its own station in Boston. The eccentric, stubborn octogenarian owner of the NBC affiliate there (WHDH channel 7) told NBC to pound sand rather than sell his station directly to NBC. The giant NBC, which is owned by Comcast, a major cable provider, then decided to strip WHDH of its NBC affiliation and start up an NBC-owned station from scratch, called WBTS and branded as NBC Boston.

NBC is launching the new station using resources from New England Cable News, a regional news channel owned by Comcast, and the Telemundo affiliate in nearby New Hampshire, the Spanish language network and station owned by NBC. But because it's nearly impossible to get a new license for an over-the-air signal from scratch these days, NBC is relying on a patchwork of low power signals and cable carriage to get the signal to actually cover Boston.

Because NBC Boston's signal is based in New Hampshire, not Boston, where the former affiliate WHDH is based, the coverage is spotty to say the least. The whole thing is silly, confusing, and mostly boils down to a greedy feud between NBC and the much smaller owner of WHDH. I can only imagine how confusing it is for Boston area viewers who actually have to deal with it. The jigsaw puzzle of low power TV stations that NBC has had to piece together to get a passable signal into the city of Boston is by no means a typical situation for US television.
Last edited by Charles on 4 January 2017 3:27am - 2 times in total
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

CNN International

Don Lemon is not respected, drunk or sober.


Really??????????????????

Just who would you respect at CNN, cos I'll take Don Lemon over some of them there any day.


Do you actually watch his show?

I was a big fan of Don Lemon back when he was a serious news anchor doing a very well-put together 8pm and 10pm weekend show. But as his on-air presence on weekdays and then weeknights became larger and larger, so did his ego and his opinions. His current show is really hard to watch — it's basically all the same pundits who aren't good enough for AC360 who have at it over the same talking points over and over again.

When it comes to CNN Domestic, the ones I like best are Jake Tapper, Brianna Keilar, Jon Berman, and Christine Romans. Notice the common thread that they're all anchors of relatively buttoned-down newscasts. Even Anderson's show isn't so bad now. The rest are more or less egomaniacs.
Last edited by Charles on 3 January 2017 9:04am
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

BBC World News from New Broadcasting House

That's true that Focus on Africa and Impact do look good from there. I think that's partly because of the warmer palette, but also because that side takes advantage of the height of the studio, it's on less of a curve than the other side, and the riser gives a little more to look at, so there's a lot less black to be seen. But perhaps as a fairer comparison, take a look at the editions of World News from B vs. from C. World News looks pretty dull from B, whereas it's very flexible and perfectly warm in C.
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

BBC World News from New Broadcasting House

I've long said that Studio B is a really unpleasant environment for television. Just take a look here (screengrab thanks to ginnyfan):

*

What makes it look so poor is how much dark, wasted space can be seen in most of the shots. The matte finish on the floor looks so dull. It would have looked so much better with a glossy finish that could have reflected the set. Secondly, while the studio is large and rather high, the set doesn't really use the height to its potential. That means there's a lot of darkness above it, and because all the monitors on that side of the set are spaced pretty far apart, many of the shots have to show a lot of black at the top and the bottom of the screen. And I'm fine with lightboxes and colorful sets, but the LED lighting isn't very well focused on anything, so it looks really washed out while also letting off that cold blue that LEDs are prone to do. Lastly, the two parts of the set are completely disjointed. Aside from Victoria Live (I think), most of the shows tend to stick to either one side or the other. That just seems like a wasted opportunity for such a large studio. Imagine what they could have done had the set been designed as one large environment rather than two mostly separate ones.

Then compare that to Studio C. While it's much smaller, you don't see very much of a dull floor at all, the set is built to its proper height, the monitors all have more definition to them than in B, and all the lightboxes let off a warmer and more focused glow. I also think the fact that it's circular and features those crazy cameras on rails means that while there are fewer shots overall, they are all lit properly and all have great depth of field.

I think one of the best examples of C looking its greatest is for Hardtalk. Had they moved it from A to B, they probably would have set up the show in front of the big video wall, and there wouldn't have been very much to look at. But in C, the show has a very nice two-shot of Stephen and the guest, and then the guest has a really nice, clean backdrop of one of the huge monitors from behind. The desk is a little awkward for an interview show, but it still works really well.
Last edited by Charles on 26 December 2016 6:19am - 3 times in total
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Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

NBC News, MSNBC, ABC News and others from across the pond

Would be a shame. The only evening news host with some authority and credibility.


His delivery is a little slow and wooden, but there's no question the broadcast has improved tremendously on his watch.

Seeing how the Page Six article has so few specifics, I doubt they're looking to make an anchor change anytime soon, especially after their competitors just did pretty recently. But it would be smart if CBS were at least thinking about who might succeed him.
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

Livestation goes dark

Wasn't it also used as a host for local news stations? Where anything short of a mess up you would never notice that it was a Livestream.


Nope, Livestream and Livestation are two different services.


Early on, it had a feature where you could submit live stream links to be added as channels. There were definitely some local outlets submitted through there. I also think their original plan was to have as many possible TV channels carried on it. They eventually did away with that when they went to a web-based service primarily offering only the news streams they carried themselves.
Charles399 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World

Livestation goes dark

Livestation, a streaming service that offered a huge variety of live news channels for free and for purchase, shut down as of three days ago. I may well be the only one on here who cares, but I thought I'd share anyway:

Quote:
The time has come to say goodbye

In 2008 Livestation partnered with some of the world’s leading news channels to launch an innovative service to watch live news online. Since then it has been used by millions of people from around the world to witness important events like the Arab Spring.

But today we are shutting down Livestation. If you subscribed to any of our premium channels this month you will receive a full refund. If you have any further questions please email support@livestation.com

It has been an incredible journey and we are humbled by the support and appreciation we have received from all of you.

Goodnight, and good luck


http://livestation.com/home

It's sad to see it go. Early on, Livestation was one of the few ways you could watch AJE in the U.S. I remember when Riz Khan's show would even direct people to it and would field questions from the chatrooms when they used to have them. It was pretty cool to ask a question in it and then see Riz ask it to the guest just mere seconds later, as what happened to me a few times. I was a subscriber for many years, mostly just so I could watch Euronews in the U.S., but I'd also use it to watch CNN and the BBC while living and traveling in Europe.

I found it strange when I got a refund email about a week ago. I suppose there's not much of a business case for this kind of service when most channels have turned to their own streaming solutions either on their own websites or on YouTube. The only channel I'm really missing now is Euronews, which is still a little hard to get in the U.S. The English stream on their website and YouTube channel is still geoblocked. I found a live stream on Dailymotion, but I'm not sure how legit it is, and it's not as high quality as the Livestation one.
Last edited by Charles on 5 December 2016 7:58am - 2 times in total