Catchup: all posts in the last 24 hours

144 posts, most recent first

123456
MetalGearRex685 posts since 11 May 2016
London London
To shroud the printout of the presentation, so people couldn't see what it said?

I'm beginning to see more of the latter in my post - are they truly that ashamed? That they produced something that was poor? The savagery must be on high levels.

To be fair, I was suspecting what you've outlined in your post.
'What is the only planet capable of sustaining life?'
'Mars.'
noggin11,954 posts since 26 Jun 2001
There are not many channels left on the sky card for Freesat customers, I think the Sony movie channel was one of them but that's now on Freeview.

It only cost £95 with Freesat.


Freesat is definitely a better bet for DSat these days. You can buy a subscription-free Freesat PVR.

A Sky+ without a subscription will NOT record, even if it has a Freesat-from-Sky card.
noggin11,954 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Leeds will often mix on the opt back, sometimes leading vision so the very end of their end sting is under the network announcer doing the menu.


That used not to be possible on digital, when there were both analogue and digital opt-outs, because as soon as network was cut-up on the studio mixer, the DTT opt-switch pinged back (after a matched delay to counteract the analogue vs digital network encode delays) The only way round it was to route network to a second input on the mixer, and cut to that instead of the nominated input (to avoid the network source get a tally) But that could cause issues with aspect ratio - and in some regions slap a nasty PAL footprint over the network feed...
MetalGearRex685 posts since 11 May 2016
London London
Couldn't help but notice this on Twitter:



Noticed it yesterday - not sure what to mean of 'cover-up' - did they deliberately change up the response, or was it kept in secret - considering how tepid the response is...
'What is the only planet capable of sustaining life?'
'Mars.'
62305817,983 posts since 19 Aug 2005
STV Central Reporting Scotland
I never understand all this pomp, at least here broom and your oot the door within hours.


I think the official US Election result isn't actually published and mandated until a few weeks after the event.
It's just that the TV networks, do such a good job at collating the results, their pronouncement just a few hours after polls close is taken as the de-facto result ? Or is that an urban myth ?


Part in Part, The full result will not be rubber stamped until later in this year. All votes are counted by 1-2 weeks after the election, since its SO Big. If there isn't any auto recounts because of the 0.5% margins, its all done and dusted. ITs not until 5 weeks later in Mid December the Electoral vote are sorted out.

It does give a good show for television and the world over the course of two months, everyone still having a field day. I still like the British way Vote one day and your oot the next Very Happy
Is the next post dreaded?
Markymark4,190 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
I never understand all this pomp, at least here broom and your oot the door within hours.


I think the official US Election result isn't actually published and mandated until a few weeks after the event.
It's just that the TV networks, do such a good job at collating the results, their pronouncement just a few hours after polls close is taken as the de-facto result ? Or is that an urban myth ?
Rkolsen995 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I definitely know Fox US fires trigger pings to affiliates for things such as local watermarking.


Yes - Fox is the odd-one-out in the US markets as it provides affiliates with a pre-encoded 'network' feed rather than a high bitrate, high quality mezzanine 'contribution quality' feed. The Fox stations all have 'splicers' installed.

These splicers take the pre-encoded MPEG2 network feed, and do a very clever partial decode to insert a local bug, by decoding just the macroblocks in the stream that need to be decoded and re-encoded to do so. The rest of the picture just passes straight through and is not decoded and recoded (avoiding further compression artefacts) This also allows Fox to tightly handle 5.1 Dolby audio on their network shows I believe - which some other networks historically struggled with (or more accurately their local stations did)

The Fox splicer also has an MPEG2 encoder for local material played out from the station (commercials, local news etc.) which is synchronised to the splicer's incoming network feed, allowing clean junctions to and from network. This gives Fox tighter control, mandates a uniform bug insertion system that can be remotely triggered etc.

This system was introduced when Fox switched from running a 480i 16:9 SD network feed - which was encoded at the local stations in 480p - and introduced 720p HD. (Fox - unlike ABC, NBC and CBS didn't initially run HD on digital OTA. Their 480p was 'good enough' for them)

This was the situation a few years ago - I think Fox may have since upgraded their splicer tech further.

ABC, CBS and NBC work differently and distribute a higher quality network feed BUT this is then permanently decoded to baseband video and then re-encoded after playout master control in each station. This requires more equipement and personnel than Fox stations I believe.

Bingo, I've had it explained to me before and it's gone in one ear and out the other, however your explanation is roughly what I've heard previously. It's seriously impressive tech.


What I always wonder is how local stations seamlessly merge their local news 'previews' into a national network ECP, along the lines of the preview BBC One viewers are treated to at 5:56pm before the Six. I know local NBC affiliates have been doing that since the late 90s, and it always looks so slick.

You can see the Fox Splicer equipment details at www.hdrollout.com

NBC distributes their signal as a 50 Mbps MPEG-2 signal. Per the public affiliation agreements on the FCC website they expect it to average around 12-15Mbps out of 19.39Mbps ATSC signal. With better encoders I think they expect a 10 Mbps average - allowing them carry another 720p channel and maybe an SD channel.

All the networks have equipment installed allowing them to switch the correct channel change to automatically for special programs or sports or the local station can handle it and triggered commercials. Part of the hardware that's used for logo insertion, severe weather tickers, the tickers during the morning shows is manufactured by EVERTZ and for NBC it's called NameDropper HD and CBS is LIDIA (not sure about abc). The functions of this hardware is triggered by the network. The tickers itself can be edited in ENPS or a simple text file where every new line is interpreted as a new headline with a divisor such as •. Some stations like Hearst have several Viz Engines at their use and they use it for snipes during programs, a much better and visual emergency alert system (better than just a line on screen), and closing. Additionally my NBC I think has coded it to have the station logo on screen in the corner where other NBC stations logos appear and disappear.


The previews you are alluding to are likely a type of soft opt.

NBC doesn't do the ECP ends where they can superimpose video above the credits but some ABC stations do. The stations have the exact timings and the dimensions of video feed so they just shrink it to fit.

NBC for example ends their primetime exactly at 10:59:30 and cuts to black and affiliates can't start early given their way of playing out the end of show credits overtop a full screen promo.

I don't watch ABC often but I think they do the same but they may have a coverable promo for video above the credits like a ECP.

For CBS I don't think would be possible as the ECP credits show a preview in a U type shape with static pillar bars on the side, and in them 4:3 safe zone there's a bottom graphic running the credits and above it in a shrunken 16:9 preview feed appears. Additionally CBS goes right up to the top of the hour with another ad break.

Hope that makes some sense.